Event Title

Session A: Climate Change - Climate Change and Sea Level Rise, Lessons from the Past and Models of the Future

Presenter Bio(s)

Rob DeConto is a Professor of Geosciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He maintains adjunct research positions at Columbia University and Victoria University of Wellington, NZ. Rob’s background spans geology, oceanography, and atmospheric science, and he has held research positions at both the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). His early research used numerical climate models to better understand the mechanisms responsible for past periods of extreme global warmth. In recent years, his research has shifted toward the polar regions- including fieldwork in Antarctica, the development of coupled climate-ice sheet models, and the application of those models to a wide range of past and future climate scenarios. Rob currently serves on several national and international science boards and advisory panels and he is currently co-chair of Antarctic Climate Evolution (ACE), an international research program under the auspices of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research.

Location

Auditorium Campus Center University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Event Website

http://blogs.umass.edu/nes2011/

Start Date

18-11-2011 1:10 PM

End Date

17-11-2011 2:00 PM

Description

Recent observations of the polar ice sheets show an accelerating rate of fresh water input to the global ocean, yet the dynamic behavior of the ice sheets and the potential rate and magnitude of future sea level rise remain difficult to predict. New geological discoveries from the Arctic and Antarctic indicate a highly sensitive polar climate system, and far greater variability of the ice sheets than previously suspected. Here, we’ll review some of these recent findings in the context of new climate and ice sheet modeling studies, providing a geological perspective on climate sensitivity and the potential response of the ice sheets to a warming world.

RobDecanto.pdf (66 kB)


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Nov 18th, 1:10 PM Nov 17th, 2:00 PM

Session A: Climate Change - Climate Change and Sea Level Rise, Lessons from the Past and Models of the Future

Auditorium Campus Center University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Recent observations of the polar ice sheets show an accelerating rate of fresh water input to the global ocean, yet the dynamic behavior of the ice sheets and the potential rate and magnitude of future sea level rise remain difficult to predict. New geological discoveries from the Arctic and Antarctic indicate a highly sensitive polar climate system, and far greater variability of the ice sheets than previously suspected. Here, we’ll review some of these recent findings in the context of new climate and ice sheet modeling studies, providing a geological perspective on climate sensitivity and the potential response of the ice sheets to a warming world.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/climate_nuclearpower/2011/nov18/3