Presenter Bio(s)

Michael W. Golay is Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he has worked since 1971, focusing on improving nuclear power performance, safety, and economics through the use of probabilistic and dynamic methods of analysis. He has been an advisor to governmental and industrial organizations concerning risk-informed regulation and nuclear non-proliferation, and has been a leader in the debate over nuclear power’s role in society. He received a BME degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Florida in 1964
and a PhD in Nuclear Engineering from Cornell in 1969. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Nuclear Society.

Location

Auditorium, Campus Center, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Event Website

http://blogs.umass.edu/nes2011/

Start Date

18-11-2011 4:00 PM

End Date

18-11-2011 4:50 PM

Description

The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Reexamination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely; particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

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Nuclear Commons

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Nov 18th, 4:00 PM Nov 18th, 4:50 PM

Session B: The Future of Nuclear Power - The Fukushima Nuclear Event and Its Implications for Nuclear Power

Auditorium, Campus Center, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Reexamination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely; particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/climate_nuclearpower/2011/nov18/7