Event Title

Session F: Contributed Oral Papers – F3: Cosmology, Theory: Theoretical Considerations for Black Hole Formation in Supernova Ejecta

Presenter Information

Andrew Hayes, University of Maine

Location

Concourse, Campus Center, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Event Website

http://blogs.umass.edu/nes2011/

Start Date

19-11-2011 8:00 AM

End Date

19-11-2011 8:12 AM

Description

We present a method for detecting regions within a dataset from a simulation of a high energy astrophysical event, such as a supernova, that are unstable to gravitational collapse. This method can be used where the resolution, spatial domain, and/or time span of the simulation may not be sufficient to evolve the region to gravitational collapse natively. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by applying it to various spherical mass distributions whose stability is known through other means. We have already used the method in the analysis of datasets from three simulations, with negative results. We also discuss the consequences of the ongoing production of low-mass, high-velocity black holes.



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Nov 19th, 8:00 AM Nov 19th, 8:12 AM

Session F: Contributed Oral Papers – F3: Cosmology, Theory: Theoretical Considerations for Black Hole Formation in Supernova Ejecta

Concourse, Campus Center, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

We present a method for detecting regions within a dataset from a simulation of a high energy astrophysical event, such as a supernova, that are unstable to gravitational collapse. This method can be used where the resolution, spatial domain, and/or time span of the simulation may not be sufficient to evolve the region to gravitational collapse natively. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by applying it to various spherical mass distributions whose stability is known through other means. We have already used the method in the analysis of datasets from three simulations, with negative results. We also discuss the consequences of the ongoing production of low-mass, high-velocity black holes.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/climate_nuclearpower/2011/nov19/18