Event Title

Session F: Contributed Oral Papers – F4: Theory: Hadronic Parity Violation

Location

Room 101, Campus Center, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Event Website

http://blogs.umass.edu/nes2011/

Start Date

19-11-2011 8:24 AM

End Date

19-11-2011 8:36 AM

Description

For 50 years the field of hadronic parity violation has been unresolved. Since the 1980's the standard theoretical framework for hadronic parity violation has been the DDH model. However, discrepancies between the DDH model and experiment have called the use of this model into question. At low energies a new model independent analysis of hadronic parity violation can be carried out via pionless effective field theory. With the use of pionless effective field theory and new precision experiments, focusing on systems with $\mathrm{A} \leq 4$ in order to eliminate nuclear physics uncertainties, the field of hadronic parity violation at low energies will finally be understood. This talk will give an overview of the theory and possible future experiments in this old yet still exciting field.

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Nov 19th, 8:24 AM Nov 19th, 8:36 AM

Session F: Contributed Oral Papers – F4: Theory: Hadronic Parity Violation

Room 101, Campus Center, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

For 50 years the field of hadronic parity violation has been unresolved. Since the 1980's the standard theoretical framework for hadronic parity violation has been the DDH model. However, discrepancies between the DDH model and experiment have called the use of this model into question. At low energies a new model independent analysis of hadronic parity violation can be carried out via pionless effective field theory. With the use of pionless effective field theory and new precision experiments, focusing on systems with $\mathrm{A} \leq 4$ in order to eliminate nuclear physics uncertainties, the field of hadronic parity violation at low energies will finally be understood. This talk will give an overview of the theory and possible future experiments in this old yet still exciting field.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/climate_nuclearpower/2011/nov19/46