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In pursuit of a balanced system of educational assessment: An evaluation of the pre-kindergarten through 8th grade math assessment system in one Massachusetts regional school district

Rita J Detweiler, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Abstract

School leaders in the United States live in an educational era characterized by a desire for and expectation that all students attain high levels of academic proficiency. There is an increased reliance on all types of educational assessment as a key component to help school leaders attain that goal. The purpose of this study is to understand how school administrators can foster a balanced system of assessment at the local level to genuinely harness the power of assessment to enhance student learning. The significance of the study rests in the fact that there is a general failure of states and school districts to conceive of educational assessment as a system that operates at all levels of the educational system from the classroom up to the district and state level. The findings of this study support the efforts of a group of administrators to develop a balanced system of math assessments in their school district. ^

Subject Area

Mathematics education|Educational tests & measurements|Educational leadership|School administration|Educational administration

Recommended Citation

Detweiler, Rita J, "In pursuit of a balanced system of educational assessment: An evaluation of the pre-kindergarten through 8th grade math assessment system in one Massachusetts regional school district" (2012). Doctoral Dissertations Available from Proquest. AAI3518224.
http://scholarworks.umass.edu/dissertations/AAI3518224

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