Off-campus UMass Amherst users: To download dissertations, please use the following link to log into our proxy server with your UMass Amherst user name and password.

Non-UMass Amherst users, please click the view more button below to purchase a copy of this dissertation from Proquest.

(Some titles may also be available free of charge in our Open Access Dissertation Collection, so please check there first.)

AN EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS' ATTITUDES TOWARD WOMEN IN EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION

CONSTANCE M FUSCO, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Abstract

In public schools the majority of teaching positions are filled by women, and the majority of school administrative positions are filled by men. The purpose of this study was to identify and examine teachers' personal perceptions and attitudes which continue the tradition of few women in school administration and to determine what factors contribute to keeping women from pursuing careers in education administration. More specifically, the questions that guided this study are: (1) Do women want to be in education administration? (2) Are teachers willing to support women administrators? (3) Do teachers believe that women have as equal an opportunity as men in acquiring an administrative position? (4) What factors would inhibit women from pursuing positions in school administration? (5) What traits do teachers feel most important for administrators to possess?^ The significance of the study was to provide a better understanding of the issues and problems confronting women who wish to, or attempt to, pursue careers in education administration.^ A two-page, four-sided, mail questionnaire was designed and mailed to a sampling of 251 teachers, members of the Massachusetts Teachers Association. Seventy-three percent of the surveys were returned and sixty-five percent were considered usable returns. Conclusions drawn from the study were: (1) Male and female teachers shared an equal past interest in school administration and indicated that no specific factors inhibited them from pursuing such careers. (2) More male than female teachers indicated having a future interest in school administration, actively applied for administrative positions, and took more courses in education administration. (3) The majority of teachers indicated a willingness to support female administrators. (4) The majority of teachers were uncertain if their school system would hire female administrators. (5) Male teachers listed as the three most important administrative traits: the ability to deal with conflicts, communication skills, and being objective. Female teachers listed communication skills, ability to deal with conflicts, and self-confidence. Three least important traits for both genders were being aggressive, competitive, and authoritarian. ^

Subject Area

Educational administration

Recommended Citation

FUSCO, CONSTANCE M, "AN EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS' ATTITUDES TOWARD WOMEN IN EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION" (1984). Doctoral Dissertations Available from Proquest. AAI8410286.
http://scholarworks.umass.edu/dissertations/AAI8410286

Share

COinS