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Agriculture, warfare, and tribalization in the Iroquois homeland of New York: A G.I.S. analysis of Late Woodland settlement

Robert John Hasenstab, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Abstract

The evolution of Iroquoian culture coincided with the development of agriculture, warfare, and tribalization during the Late Woodland Period in the Northeast. Implicit in the currently-held in situ hypothesis is the assumption that these processes occurred endogenously, i.e., as local developments throughout the Iroquoian homeland, arising spontaneously from the adoption of maize horticulture. Two alternative hypotheses for Iroquoian social change are evaluated here; both assume that change was induced exogenously, from pressure generated from the interior of the continent, imposed on Iroquoia from the Ohio/Allegheny River drainage and the Lake Erie basin to the south and west. The three hypotheses are evaluated through an analysis of settlement in the New York Iroquoian homeland. ^

Subject Area

Archaeology|American history|Native American studies

Recommended Citation

Hasenstab, Robert John, "Agriculture, warfare, and tribalization in the Iroquois homeland of New York: A G.I.S. analysis of Late Woodland settlement" (1990). Doctoral Dissertations Available from Proquest. AAI9035389.
http://scholarworks.umass.edu/dissertations/AAI9035389

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