Off-campus UMass Amherst users: To download dissertations, please use the following link to log into our proxy server with your UMass Amherst user name and password.

Non-UMass Amherst users, please click the view more button below to purchase a copy of this dissertation from Proquest.

(Some titles may also be available free of charge in our Open Access Dissertation Collection, so please check there first.)

A study of the visual creative process through the examination of an artist and his art

Roger Leroy Preston, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Abstract

This study explores the nature of the visual creative process of an artist. Most of the literature is secondary and seems only to meet the needs of the writer, critic or publication. This is a limited study, because as an artist I created a body of work on the Macintosh computer to track the creative process.^ Because of this special subjectivity, my project was intensely personal, dealing with my own feelings, memory, and psychological makeup. Though limited, the study does, nevertheless, add to the literature about the creative process. I have choosen the Holocaust-- an historical event because its scale and its particular horrors, touch all people.^ I shared my art work with Holocaust survivors, and asked them for responses. Their responses were a crucial part of my research. In this way I hope to broaden knowledge about the impact that the visual arts have, and how that impact happens. Finally, this research has pedagogical implications to help define the creative process in the visual arts. My own creative process, noted by me, served as a model of one possible way the visual creative process works, and this model was useful in leading students to uncover their own processes. ^

Subject Area

Art education|Community college education|Fine arts

Recommended Citation

Preston, Roger Leroy, "A study of the visual creative process through the examination of an artist and his art" (1994). Doctoral Dissertations Available from Proquest. AAI9510529.
http://scholarworks.umass.edu/dissertations/AAI9510529

Share

COinS