Event Title

Session C1 - Case Study - Project Application of the Stream Functions Pyramid Framework

Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

5-6-2012 10:50 AM

End Date

5-6-2012 11:10 AM

Description

Over the past two decades there has been a significant advancement in the science of stream restoration. Much effort has been spent on understanding channel dimension, pattern and profile. However, not as much consideration has been given to understanding how stream functions influence channel dimension, pattern and profile. Harman et al. has produced the Stream Functions Pyramid Framework which addresses this issue and provides guidance on applications relevant to stream restoration. This presentation provides a case example of how the framework can be applied on a reach specific stream restoration project. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service used the Stream Functions Pyramid Framework to conduct functional and stability assessments, set quantifiable restoration goals and objectives, create design criteria and establish quantifiable monitoring performance standards for the Mossy Creek Stream Restoration Project, Augusta County, Virginia.

Comments

Ben Hutzell is a Biologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service. His expertise includes stream restoration assessment, stream restoration design and project implementation management. Ben has been directly involved with the implementation of over 25,000 linear feet of stream restoration and is currently working on multiple stream restoration projects and dam removals across the Mid-Atlantic region. He holds a BS degree in Environmental Analysis and Planning.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 5th, 10:50 AM Jun 5th, 11:10 AM

Session C1 - Case Study - Project Application of the Stream Functions Pyramid Framework

UMass Amherst

Over the past two decades there has been a significant advancement in the science of stream restoration. Much effort has been spent on understanding channel dimension, pattern and profile. However, not as much consideration has been given to understanding how stream functions influence channel dimension, pattern and profile. Harman et al. has produced the Stream Functions Pyramid Framework which addresses this issue and provides guidance on applications relevant to stream restoration. This presentation provides a case example of how the framework can be applied on a reach specific stream restoration project. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service used the Stream Functions Pyramid Framework to conduct functional and stability assessments, set quantifiable restoration goals and objectives, create design criteria and establish quantifiable monitoring performance standards for the Mossy Creek Stream Restoration Project, Augusta County, Virginia.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June5/10