Presenter Information

Roy Schiff, Milone & MacBroom, Inc.

Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

5-6-2012 1:30 PM

End Date

5-6-2012 1:50 PM

Description

When the Addison and Chittenden County Regional Planning Commissions and the Lewis Creek Association of Charlotte, Vermont learned about the 2013 repaving project on Vermont Route 116 the groups realized that many culverts could be improved for both conveyance and aquatic organism passage (AOP) along the roadway in a very short timeframe. Existing assessment data indicated that many fish blocks existed along this roadway. In addition, unassessed culverts could quickly be looked at using the Vermont Bridge and Culvert Assessment Protocols, as well as the AOP and Geomorphic Compatibility Screening Tools, to rapidly assess and determine if retrofit or replacement could improve AOP. The fortunate timing in advance of the repaving project allowed for collaboration to improve AOP over the road corridor in two Towns. The Vermont Agency of Transportation was contacted to inquire when the typical replacement of the deteriorated or problem smaller culverts would take place. Vermont Fish and Wildlife was contacted for fish and habitat data. The Towns joined the group understanding that infrastructure improvements were on their way. The group coalesced, the project was developed, and consulting services were obtained to perform the project. Collaboration will expand the standard practice focusing on structural integrity and conveyance to improve AOP. At the time of the writing of this abstract the project kick-off meeting has just taken place and some assessment data have been gathered.

At the time of the conference ten or more culverts are expected to have been replaced to improve AOP. Assessment, prioritization, hydraulic calculations, and design recommendations are planned to improve AOP at all of the smaller structures where suitable fish habitat exists. The presentation will cover each phase of the collaboration and report on the level of success of the approach and whether it can serve as a template for rapidly improving AOP.

Comments

Roy Schiff is a Water Resource Scientist and Engineer with Milone & MacBroom, Inc. MMI is based out of Cheshire, CT, and Roy manages their Vermont branch office that he helped open in 2005. He received his PhD from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in 2005 where his research focused on the effects of stream restoration practices on the physical, biological, and chemical components of aquatic ecosystems. Roy is a licensed Professional Engineer in Vermont and frequently works on applied projects including channel and floodplain restoration, dam and levee removal, fish passage improvement, and bank stabilization. He has developed stream management protocols used in New England such as guidelines for channel restoration, protocols for screening culverts for fish passage and geomorphic compatibility, and habitat assessment methods. Roy regularly gives presentations that illustrate the importance of working with, not against, natural river form and processes to protect water resources and reduce risks. Roy lives in Montpelier, VT with his lovely wife, two adorable daughters, and quirky dog.

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Jun 5th, 1:30 PM Jun 5th, 1:50 PM

Session B2 - Assessing, Prioritizing, and Implementing Numerous Small Culvert AOP Projects in a Short Period of Time

UMass Amherst

When the Addison and Chittenden County Regional Planning Commissions and the Lewis Creek Association of Charlotte, Vermont learned about the 2013 repaving project on Vermont Route 116 the groups realized that many culverts could be improved for both conveyance and aquatic organism passage (AOP) along the roadway in a very short timeframe. Existing assessment data indicated that many fish blocks existed along this roadway. In addition, unassessed culverts could quickly be looked at using the Vermont Bridge and Culvert Assessment Protocols, as well as the AOP and Geomorphic Compatibility Screening Tools, to rapidly assess and determine if retrofit or replacement could improve AOP. The fortunate timing in advance of the repaving project allowed for collaboration to improve AOP over the road corridor in two Towns. The Vermont Agency of Transportation was contacted to inquire when the typical replacement of the deteriorated or problem smaller culverts would take place. Vermont Fish and Wildlife was contacted for fish and habitat data. The Towns joined the group understanding that infrastructure improvements were on their way. The group coalesced, the project was developed, and consulting services were obtained to perform the project. Collaboration will expand the standard practice focusing on structural integrity and conveyance to improve AOP. At the time of the writing of this abstract the project kick-off meeting has just taken place and some assessment data have been gathered.

At the time of the conference ten or more culverts are expected to have been replaced to improve AOP. Assessment, prioritization, hydraulic calculations, and design recommendations are planned to improve AOP at all of the smaller structures where suitable fish habitat exists. The presentation will cover each phase of the collaboration and report on the level of success of the approach and whether it can serve as a template for rapidly improving AOP.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June5/21