Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

5-6-2012 4:05 PM

End Date

5-6-2012 4:25 PM

Description

Over ten years ago the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) began the process of restoring anadromous fish runs targeting river herring on three highly urbanized rivers in the greater Washington DC area. This comprehensive effort, part of the environmental mitigation for the Woodrow Wilson Bridge Project, sought to mitigate 23 barriers with nature-like fishways. These fishways used riffle grade controls and flow constrictor / step pools and were the first of their kind in the mid-Atlantic. SHA conducted intensive monitoring on all 23 structures for 5 years. The monitoring included structure stability, habitat quality, and fish and benthic macroinvertebrate collection and identification. DC Fisheries has continued to monitor for fish and eggs in one of the rivers after the 5 year period resulting in 7 years of fish passage data. These data can be combined to assess the success of the nature-like fishways over a longer period of time than many others on the East Coast.

Comments

Kathy Hoverman is a lead stream restoration designer with KCI Technologies, Inc. in Sparks Maryland. She has a BS in Civil Engineering and an MS in Biology and is a registered professional engineer in several states. She has 11 years of experience in stream assessment and design in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic with specialization in nature-like fishways in the Mid-Atlantic and New England.

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Jun 5th, 4:05 PM Jun 5th, 4:25 PM

Session C3 - A 10 Year Retrospective Look at the Current Condition and Success of Nature-Like Fishways Installed on Three Maryland Rivers

UMass Amherst

Over ten years ago the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) began the process of restoring anadromous fish runs targeting river herring on three highly urbanized rivers in the greater Washington DC area. This comprehensive effort, part of the environmental mitigation for the Woodrow Wilson Bridge Project, sought to mitigate 23 barriers with nature-like fishways. These fishways used riffle grade controls and flow constrictor / step pools and were the first of their kind in the mid-Atlantic. SHA conducted intensive monitoring on all 23 structures for 5 years. The monitoring included structure stability, habitat quality, and fish and benthic macroinvertebrate collection and identification. DC Fisheries has continued to monitor for fish and eggs in one of the rivers after the 5 year period resulting in 7 years of fish passage data. These data can be combined to assess the success of the nature-like fishways over a longer period of time than many others on the East Coast.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June5/46