Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

6-6-2012 11:10 AM

End Date

6-6-2012 11:30 AM

Description

Hydraulic conditions in the water passageways of hydroturbines in conjunction with the likelihood of contact with structure and rapid decompression have been known for decades to be factors that determine the safety of turbine passage for fish. The sensor fish, an autonomous 6 degree-of-freedom sensor, was developed to pass through an operating turbine and acquire data that permits quantification of the conditions affecting the safety of fish passage. Laboratory studies, using live fish, of rapid decompression and shear and turbulence exposure, augmented by observation of the condition of balloon tagged fish following turbine passage, have enabled linkage between sensor fish observations of passage conditions with probable impacts to turbine passed fish. Assessment of the turbine passage survival of fish at the population level has evolved considerably over the past five years with development of micro-acoustic transmitters, passive acoustic cabled and autonomous receivers, and experimental designs that deliver highly precise estimates of fish survival. The combination of sensor fish and acoustic telemetry, in conjunction with other developments, are permitting fish passage safety to be designed into new hydroturbines and field assessment of turbine operations to optimize the survival of turbine passed fish.

Comments

Dr. Carlson has been active in the development and application of tools and application methods to assess the safety of hydroturbine passage for fish for over 20 years. Current activities include redevelopment of the sensor fish to meet present and future needs and development of ultrasmall acoustic transmitters that are impantable by syringe in juvenile fish.

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Jun 6th, 11:10 AM Jun 6th, 11:30 AM

Session D4 - Assessment of the conditions for fish passage through hydroturbines and the response of fish to passage

UMass Amherst

Hydraulic conditions in the water passageways of hydroturbines in conjunction with the likelihood of contact with structure and rapid decompression have been known for decades to be factors that determine the safety of turbine passage for fish. The sensor fish, an autonomous 6 degree-of-freedom sensor, was developed to pass through an operating turbine and acquire data that permits quantification of the conditions affecting the safety of fish passage. Laboratory studies, using live fish, of rapid decompression and shear and turbulence exposure, augmented by observation of the condition of balloon tagged fish following turbine passage, have enabled linkage between sensor fish observations of passage conditions with probable impacts to turbine passed fish. Assessment of the turbine passage survival of fish at the population level has evolved considerably over the past five years with development of micro-acoustic transmitters, passive acoustic cabled and autonomous receivers, and experimental designs that deliver highly precise estimates of fish survival. The combination of sensor fish and acoustic telemetry, in conjunction with other developments, are permitting fish passage safety to be designed into new hydroturbines and field assessment of turbine operations to optimize the survival of turbine passed fish.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June6/13