Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

6-6-2012 2:10 PM

End Date

6-6-2012 2:30 PM

Description

Owing to their trans-boundary, migratory life-history, their commercial and recreational importance, and their ecological value to other commercially and recreationally important species, the restoration and protection of diadromous fish populations is a high priority for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The implementation of dam removal and other fish passage techniques is a primary tool that NOAA uses to address this priority. NOAA exercises this responsibility through a number of different programs and authorities including the Federal Power Act, Endangered Species Act, and through its pro-active restoration programs including the Community-based Restoration Program. Among the 14 diadromous species present in the Northeast United States, alewife and blueback herring are priority species for restoration. This presentation will summarize NOAA's efforts to restore these populations across the region and discuss recent and future opportunities and constraints. In particular the presentation will focus on river herring restoration accomplishments, efforts to develop a watershed-based geographic prioritization for fish passage in the Northeast, integrated monitoring, and the recent petition to list river herring under the Endangered Species Act.

Comments

John Catena is the Northeast Regional Supervisor for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Restoration Center based in Gloucester, MA. He is responsible for managing NOAA's habitat restoration programs throughout the Northeastern U.S. from Maine to Virginia and a staff of 15 professional, technical staff. John has been involved in managing, planning, and overseeing habitat restoration projects for over 15 years. He specifically has experience in the conceptual design, planning, and monitoring of tidal wetland, shellfish, riverine, and anadromous fish restoration projects including fish passage and dam removal projects. John received his B.S. in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina in 1984 and an M.A. in Marine Affairs from the University of Rhode Island in 1987.

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Jun 6th, 2:10 PM Jun 6th, 2:30 PM

Session A5 - NOAA's Efforts to Restore River Herring in the Northeast U.S.

UMass Amherst

Owing to their trans-boundary, migratory life-history, their commercial and recreational importance, and their ecological value to other commercially and recreationally important species, the restoration and protection of diadromous fish populations is a high priority for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The implementation of dam removal and other fish passage techniques is a primary tool that NOAA uses to address this priority. NOAA exercises this responsibility through a number of different programs and authorities including the Federal Power Act, Endangered Species Act, and through its pro-active restoration programs including the Community-based Restoration Program. Among the 14 diadromous species present in the Northeast United States, alewife and blueback herring are priority species for restoration. This presentation will summarize NOAA's efforts to restore these populations across the region and discuss recent and future opportunities and constraints. In particular the presentation will focus on river herring restoration accomplishments, efforts to develop a watershed-based geographic prioritization for fish passage in the Northeast, integrated monitoring, and the recent petition to list river herring under the Endangered Species Act.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June6/24