Presenter Information

John Jengo, MWHFollow

Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

6-6-2012 3:25 PM

End Date

6-6-2012 3:45 PM

Description

An innovative Natural Resource Damages (NRD) Settlement Agreement between the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and El Paso Corporation, formulated to address claimed lost ecological services caused by former industrial operations discharging into several New Jersey rivers, specified the removal of three lowhead dams (Calco Dam, Nevius Street Dam, and Robert Street Dam) on the main stem of the historic Raritan River in central New Jersey. The most downriver dam (Calco Dam), a former chemical dispersion weir located in the vicinity of Bound Brook, was successfully removed between July 18 - August 2, 2011. The dam was initially breached over a specific modeled width, which allowed the upriver impoundment to completely drain by the end of the working day without triggering adverse sediment transport. The subsequent two weeks of work involved removal of the dam's deeper infrastructure, careful severing of the dam where it was underlying a historic 175-yr old canal towpath berm, and removal of all concrete and rebar from the river. The final aspects of the project included grading of the river bed and restoration of embankments back to their pre-dam configuration. This dam removal re-opened 6.1 miles of the Raritan River and 1.5 miles of the Millstone River, in addition to the lower reaches of several significant tributaries, which have widespread sandy and pebbly gravel river bed substrates, ideal spawning habitat for anadromous fish species such as American shad that formerly numbered in the millions. The Robert Street Dam, a sheet-piled supported structure encasing an older concrete gravity dam located seven miles upriver of the former Calco Dam, is slated for removal in July-August 2012, which will then be followed by the breaching of the Nevius Street Dam, thus satisfying the NRD Settlement terms and completing New Jersey's most significant river restoration project to date.

Comments

John W. Jengo, PG, a licensed Professional Geologist in several Northeastern states and a Licensed Site Remediation Professional in New Jersey, works as a Principal Hydrogeologist in an environmental consulting firm in southeastern Pennylvania. He has degrees in geology from Rutgers University (1980) and the University of Delaware (1982). Over the last 20 years, he has lead the characterization and remediation of large, complex contaminated industrial sites throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. He is the technical project manager in the effort to restore historically significant fish spawning grounds of the Raritan River in central New Jersey and successfully managed the removal of the Calco Dam in July-August 2011. He has authored many peer-reviewed geological articles for scientific journals about his stratigraphic and environmental investigative work, as well as scientific aspects of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

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Jun 6th, 3:25 PM Jun 6th, 3:45 PM

Session C6 - Calco Dam Removal - Commencing the Restoration of the Raritan River Watershed, New Jersey

UMass Amherst

An innovative Natural Resource Damages (NRD) Settlement Agreement between the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and El Paso Corporation, formulated to address claimed lost ecological services caused by former industrial operations discharging into several New Jersey rivers, specified the removal of three lowhead dams (Calco Dam, Nevius Street Dam, and Robert Street Dam) on the main stem of the historic Raritan River in central New Jersey. The most downriver dam (Calco Dam), a former chemical dispersion weir located in the vicinity of Bound Brook, was successfully removed between July 18 - August 2, 2011. The dam was initially breached over a specific modeled width, which allowed the upriver impoundment to completely drain by the end of the working day without triggering adverse sediment transport. The subsequent two weeks of work involved removal of the dam's deeper infrastructure, careful severing of the dam where it was underlying a historic 175-yr old canal towpath berm, and removal of all concrete and rebar from the river. The final aspects of the project included grading of the river bed and restoration of embankments back to their pre-dam configuration. This dam removal re-opened 6.1 miles of the Raritan River and 1.5 miles of the Millstone River, in addition to the lower reaches of several significant tributaries, which have widespread sandy and pebbly gravel river bed substrates, ideal spawning habitat for anadromous fish species such as American shad that formerly numbered in the millions. The Robert Street Dam, a sheet-piled supported structure encasing an older concrete gravity dam located seven miles upriver of the former Calco Dam, is slated for removal in July-August 2012, which will then be followed by the breaching of the Nevius Street Dam, thus satisfying the NRD Settlement terms and completing New Jersey's most significant river restoration project to date.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June6/30