Event Title

Session D7 - Installation of large wood in a homogenous reach of a coastal stream to restore California Central Coast Coho habitat

Location

UMass Amherst

Event Website

http://fishpassage.ecs.umass.edu/Conference2012/

Start Date

7-6-2012 11:10 AM

End Date

7-6-2012 11:30 AM

Description

On the Central Coast of California, through collaborative planning across state, local, and federal resources agencies, including NMFS, the NOAA Restoration Center, and the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County (RCD SCC) and NRCS planned and implemented eight innovative large wood log structures along two reaches of San Vicente Creek in Davenport, California. The project fulfills a key recovery action at the southern extent of for the imperiled Central California Coast (CCC) Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The project was collaboratively developed and designed through the Integrated Watershed Restoration Program (IWRP) with significant input from NMFS and CDFG fisheries biologists. Permitting was facilitated through a Permit Coordination program brokered by the RCD SCC. Prior to construction in Fall 2011, the stream resembled a "bowling alley", with straightened reaches of uniform bed material, high velocities, minimal wood cover and pools, and adverse habitat conditions for young coho and steelhead. The large wood log project on San Vicente Creek is a unique opportunity to increase channel complexity for CCC Coho salmon and test recovery strategies in a stream with year round ocean access, high summer base flows, cool summer temperatures, limited diversions, proximity to the larger Scott Creek watershed, and recent successful implementations of alcove, pond, and backwater restoration. This presentation will discuss the engineering and collaboration to install and anchor large wood in San Vicente Creek. Over time the large wood is expected to create local scour pools and cover for salmonids, sort bed material, trap volunteer wood, and activate the low flood plain through deflection and channel obstruction. During construction, the NRCS design engineer and the SCC RCD staff worked closely with the contractor to optimize wood placement and anchoring, while minimizing impacts to the riparian corridor. The site will be monitored intensively by the RCD SCC and NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center for 5 and 10 years, respectively. In addition, San Vicente Creek is planned as a recipient for planting of CCC Coho salmon from the nearby Monterey Bay Salmon and Trout broodstock program.

Comments

Denis Ruttenberg is a Stream Engineer at USDA NRCS in the Central Coast of California. He plans, designs, and implements habitat restoration as part of a partnership agreement with the USFWS. He has a Master of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Idaho, Center for Ecohydraulics Research in Boise (CER) and a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of California Davis. For his thesis at the CER, he created hydraulic models at rock weirs and evaluated effectiveness of fish passage on streams in the Methow River Basin, located in North-central Washington. Since 1992, he has worked in water resources consulting and Civil Engineering, including 10 years of intensive design and implementation of instream and wetland habitat projects throughout the Central California Coast and San Francisco Bay Area.

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Jun 7th, 11:10 AM Jun 7th, 11:30 AM

Session D7 - Installation of large wood in a homogenous reach of a coastal stream to restore California Central Coast Coho habitat

UMass Amherst

On the Central Coast of California, through collaborative planning across state, local, and federal resources agencies, including NMFS, the NOAA Restoration Center, and the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County (RCD SCC) and NRCS planned and implemented eight innovative large wood log structures along two reaches of San Vicente Creek in Davenport, California. The project fulfills a key recovery action at the southern extent of for the imperiled Central California Coast (CCC) Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The project was collaboratively developed and designed through the Integrated Watershed Restoration Program (IWRP) with significant input from NMFS and CDFG fisheries biologists. Permitting was facilitated through a Permit Coordination program brokered by the RCD SCC. Prior to construction in Fall 2011, the stream resembled a "bowling alley", with straightened reaches of uniform bed material, high velocities, minimal wood cover and pools, and adverse habitat conditions for young coho and steelhead. The large wood log project on San Vicente Creek is a unique opportunity to increase channel complexity for CCC Coho salmon and test recovery strategies in a stream with year round ocean access, high summer base flows, cool summer temperatures, limited diversions, proximity to the larger Scott Creek watershed, and recent successful implementations of alcove, pond, and backwater restoration. This presentation will discuss the engineering and collaboration to install and anchor large wood in San Vicente Creek. Over time the large wood is expected to create local scour pools and cover for salmonids, sort bed material, trap volunteer wood, and activate the low flood plain through deflection and channel obstruction. During construction, the NRCS design engineer and the SCC RCD staff worked closely with the contractor to optimize wood placement and anchoring, while minimizing impacts to the riparian corridor. The site will be monitored intensively by the RCD SCC and NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center for 5 and 10 years, respectively. In addition, San Vicente Creek is planned as a recipient for planting of CCC Coho salmon from the nearby Monterey Bay Salmon and Trout broodstock program.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2012/June7/9