Start Date

7-1-2011 2:30 PM

End Date

7-1-2011 3:15 PM

Track

2. Track 2 - Poster Session

Subject Area

Food Service

Faculty Member

Behnke, Carl (chefcarl@purdue.edu)

Abstract

Temporary foodservice establishments (TFEs) such as farmer’s markets, festivals, and roadside stands tend to be more loosely regulated than permanent foodservice operations, in some cases allowing food prepared in uninspected homes to be sold to the public, and in other situations, exempting them from formal health department oversight. Due to these gaps in training and oversight, there are increased opportunities for foodborne illness outbreaks, placing the public at an increased risk. This study will use observational techniques in combination with a previously developed observational instrument at three types of temporary foodservice establishments: farmer’s markets, festivals, and roadside stands to answer the following research questions; (1) How do observed food handling behaviors and environmental conditions compare to Indiana health department expectations/standards? (2) Are there any relationships between the frequency of malpractices, type of product sold, nature of the operation, location of the operation, and vendor demographics? (3) How do food handling behaviors and environmental conditions differ across the type of temporary foodservice establishments?

Keywords

Temporary foodservice establishments, food safety, farmer’s markets, festivals, roadside stands, observation



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Jan 7th, 2:30 PM Jan 7th, 3:15 PM

The Assessment of Food Safety Practices in Temporary Foodservice Establishments

Temporary foodservice establishments (TFEs) such as farmer’s markets, festivals, and roadside stands tend to be more loosely regulated than permanent foodservice operations, in some cases allowing food prepared in uninspected homes to be sold to the public, and in other situations, exempting them from formal health department oversight. Due to these gaps in training and oversight, there are increased opportunities for foodborne illness outbreaks, placing the public at an increased risk. This study will use observational techniques in combination with a previously developed observational instrument at three types of temporary foodservice establishments: farmer’s markets, festivals, and roadside stands to answer the following research questions; (1) How do observed food handling behaviors and environmental conditions compare to Indiana health department expectations/standards? (2) Are there any relationships between the frequency of malpractices, type of product sold, nature of the operation, location of the operation, and vendor demographics? (3) How do food handling behaviors and environmental conditions differ across the type of temporary foodservice establishments?