Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Projects

Access Control

Open Access

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Embargo Period

3-4-2016

Degree Program

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Degree Track

Family Nurse Practioner

Year Degree Awarded

2015

Month Degree Awarded

May

Keywords

Obesity, Weight loss, BMI, healthy living, small changes

Advisor

Genevieve Chandler

DNP Project Chair

Genevieve Chandler

DNP Project Member Name

Edith Dundon

DNP Project Outside Member Name

Michele Parker

Abstract

Abstract

Obesity is a major health threat in the United States. Excess weight can have devastating effects on an individual’s overall health and well-being. This research translation project utilized the 12-week small-change approach to weight loss as an intervention, which is shown to be feasible and beneficial for weight loss. This intervention has been successful in the ASPIRE-VA pilot study with 14 sedentary, obese middle-aged male and female veterans (Damschroder, Lutes, Goodrich, Gillon, & Lowry, 2009). For this project the intervention was implemented in a family practice office in Gardner, Massachusetts. Ten female, predominantly Caucasian, participants volunteered to participate in this project in response to mailings and office flyers that were used to recruit eligible participants. The results included a significant weight loss in pounds, decrease in BMI, decreased waist circumference (in inches), and a decrease in systolic blood pressure readings. There was also a significant decrease in consumption of fast food at 12 weeks compared to baseline. Satisfaction with life scores increased post-intervention compared to pre-intervention. There was no significant change in fruit and vegetable consumption from baseline to 12 weeks. Although there was not a significant change observed in consumption of sugary sweetened beverages, most participants did not drink these beverages at baseline. There was no significant change in SF-12 health survey results pre-and post-intervention. There was no significant change in number of days per week an individual ate breakfast or exercised. Further studies are needed on weight loss interventions that are feasible in primary care patient settings.

Keywords: Obesity, Weight loss, BMI, healthy living, small changes

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