Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Projects

Access Control

Open Access

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Embargo Period

4-29-2017

Degree Program

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Degree Track

Family Nurse Practioner

Year Degree Awarded

2016

Month Degree Awarded

May

Keywords

pneumococcal, pneumonia, patient education, vaccination, barriers, older adults

Advisor Name

Pamela

Advisor Last Name

Aselton

Capstone Chair First Name

Pamela

Capstone Chair Last Name

Aselton

Capstone Member Name

Raeann

Leblanc

Capstone Outside Member Name

Vanessa

Sheehan

Abstract

Background:Pneumococcal disease is a transmitted infectious illness that results in serious complications and death every year in the United States. Given their increased susceptibility to the potential complications of this disease, patients aged 65 and older are considered to be high-risk, but vaccination compliance for this population remain well below state and national goals.

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to increase pneumococcal vaccination rates among adults aged 65 and older in a primary care clinic by increasing patient education.

Methods: An educational intervention was implemented within a large primary care practice located in Central Massachusetts. Educational materials were distributed within the clinic, including posters, vaccine information sheets, and flyers. Cumulative vaccination rates for pneumococcal pneumonia among the target population were analyzed pre and post intervention to evaluate project impact. Mixed methods were used for analyzing project results.

Results: Results demonstrated a nearly 10% increase in cumulative vaccination rates after project implementation. There also proved a statistically significant relationship between patient education and rates of vaccination exists (p < .0001).

Conclusion: The project’s findings demonstrate that increasing patient education in the primary care setting can improve rates of vaccination against pneumococcal pneumonia in vulnerable patient populations.

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