Event Title

Morning Keynote: Beyond Programming: Toward Embedded Mentoring Practices in the Support of Student Transitions

Location

Campus Center Auditorium, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Event Website

http://www.umass.edu/studentsuccessconference/index.php

Start Date

11-10-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

11-10-2013 10:00 AM

Description

Becky Wai-Ling Packard's research focuses on mentoring, with an emphasis on how individuals such as first-generation college students, women, and persons of color construct and use mentoring networks and navigate complex pathways toward higher education and work. She frequently speaks on these topics, designs mentoring programs, and offers expert advice on ways to foster a climate in which mentoring all students toward the highest levels of excellence is possible. She recently contributed to a National Academy of Science summit and volume examining the role of community colleges in STEM fields. Her research has been generously supported by the National Science Foundation. In 2005, Packard visited the White House where she received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government to early career scientists. Packard received her doctorate in educational psychology from Michigan State University and she holds a B.A. in psychology from the University of Michigan.

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Oct 11th, 9:00 AM Oct 11th, 10:00 AM

Morning Keynote: Beyond Programming: Toward Embedded Mentoring Practices in the Support of Student Transitions

Campus Center Auditorium, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Becky Wai-Ling Packard's research focuses on mentoring, with an emphasis on how individuals such as first-generation college students, women, and persons of color construct and use mentoring networks and navigate complex pathways toward higher education and work. She frequently speaks on these topics, designs mentoring programs, and offers expert advice on ways to foster a climate in which mentoring all students toward the highest levels of excellence is possible. She recently contributed to a National Academy of Science summit and volume examining the role of community colleges in STEM fields. Her research has been generously supported by the National Science Foundation. In 2005, Packard visited the White House where she received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government to early career scientists. Packard received her doctorate in educational psychology from Michigan State University and she holds a B.A. in psychology from the University of Michigan.

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/studentsuccess/2013/Schedule/23