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Abstract

Many rural towns and villages fail to achieve their tourism development goals because the pulling power of their attractions is not strong enough. An appropriate combination of minor attractions may be an effective means of increasing the pulling power of these destinations. This study demonstrates a method for predicting the probability of a visit to other attractions based on the visitation of one attraction. Along with other analyses, a series of 11 bivariate logistic regression analyses predicts the probability of tourists visiting the 10 other attractions if they visited a specific attraction. For example, the results indicate that a visit to Sunset Crater may be nearly 19 times more likely when Wupatki National Monument is visited. The study demonstrates that separating natural and cultural attractions, while valid for solving many research problems, is of little value in understanding the behavior of general sightseeing visitors. The results of the research method may be useful for creating a strong image for the destination, cross-marketing attractions, developing packages that sell local lodging and food service, for advertising and for developing tours.

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MEASURING PROBABILITIES IN ATTRACTION VISITATION

Many rural towns and villages fail to achieve their tourism development goals because the pulling power of their attractions is not strong enough. An appropriate combination of minor attractions may be an effective means of increasing the pulling power of these destinations. This study demonstrates a method for predicting the probability of a visit to other attractions based on the visitation of one attraction. Along with other analyses, a series of 11 bivariate logistic regression analyses predicts the probability of tourists visiting the 10 other attractions if they visited a specific attraction. For example, the results indicate that a visit to Sunset Crater may be nearly 19 times more likely when Wupatki National Monument is visited. The study demonstrates that separating natural and cultural attractions, while valid for solving many research problems, is of little value in understanding the behavior of general sightseeing visitors. The results of the research method may be useful for creating a strong image for the destination, cross-marketing attractions, developing packages that sell local lodging and food service, for advertising and for developing tours.