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Abstract

Self-image congruence is recognised as an important construct in explaining and predicting various aspects of consumer behaviour. However, empirical investigations on the application of self-congruence theories to understand tourists’ post-consumption behaviours are still in its infancy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of self-image congruence, cruisers’ experiences and satisfaction on intention to recommend. Partial Least Square (PLS) path modelling was used to test the hypotheses. Results indicate that self-image congruence (actual and ideal) has significant direct effects on cruisers’ experiences, which in turn influence tourists’ satisfaction. In addition, satisfaction mediates the relationship between cruisers’ experiences and intention to recommend. Overall, this research further establishes the validity of self-congruity theory in the context of cruising, an under-explored area in tourism literature and offers important managerial implications.

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The Effects of Self-Image Congruence, Tourists’ Experiences and Satisfaction on Behavioral Intention

Self-image congruence is recognised as an important construct in explaining and predicting various aspects of consumer behaviour. However, empirical investigations on the application of self-congruence theories to understand tourists’ post-consumption behaviours are still in its infancy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of self-image congruence, cruisers’ experiences and satisfaction on intention to recommend. Partial Least Square (PLS) path modelling was used to test the hypotheses. Results indicate that self-image congruence (actual and ideal) has significant direct effects on cruisers’ experiences, which in turn influence tourists’ satisfaction. In addition, satisfaction mediates the relationship between cruisers’ experiences and intention to recommend. Overall, this research further establishes the validity of self-congruity theory in the context of cruising, an under-explored area in tourism literature and offers important managerial implications.