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Abstract

Once a marginal activity undertaken by backpackers, working holiday tourism has now gradually become accepted by young people. This study extends the means-end approach to examine the factors associated with the tourists’ experiences. The main purpose is to learn more about the role and meaning of the benefits from this type of travelling. By using the “laddering” technique, a total of 60 subjects participated in one-on-one in-depth personal interviews and the interviewing data were then analyzed. These outcomes generally referred to positive consequences or benefits. Of these benefits, those involving being independent in personal finances, escapism, experiencing a different culture, developing a range of skills, and making relationships have received the most prior research attention. The subjects provided information regarding the higher-level meanings related to these intermediated-level benefits, such as self-change and being open-minded. The results also highlighted several key personal values (in particular, accomplishment, self-confidence, unforgettable memories and satisfying one’s curiosity) that appeared to serve as the higher level “ends” of the experiences. The study’s findings have important implications for researchers and practitioners interested in the study of working holiday tourism.

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An Investigation of Working Holiday Experiences: A Means-End Analysis Approach

Once a marginal activity undertaken by backpackers, working holiday tourism has now gradually become accepted by young people. This study extends the means-end approach to examine the factors associated with the tourists’ experiences. The main purpose is to learn more about the role and meaning of the benefits from this type of travelling. By using the “laddering” technique, a total of 60 subjects participated in one-on-one in-depth personal interviews and the interviewing data were then analyzed. These outcomes generally referred to positive consequences or benefits. Of these benefits, those involving being independent in personal finances, escapism, experiencing a different culture, developing a range of skills, and making relationships have received the most prior research attention. The subjects provided information regarding the higher-level meanings related to these intermediated-level benefits, such as self-change and being open-minded. The results also highlighted several key personal values (in particular, accomplishment, self-confidence, unforgettable memories and satisfying one’s curiosity) that appeared to serve as the higher level “ends” of the experiences. The study’s findings have important implications for researchers and practitioners interested in the study of working holiday tourism.