Presenter Bios

Dr. Dan McCole is an Associate Professor at Michigan State University where his work focuses on natural resource and agriculture-based tourism. More specifically, Dan’s research and outreach focus on issues facing small tourism businesses and how tourism can contribute to the economic, environmental and social sustainability of communities. Dan and his team have recently conducted several studies about wine tourism including detailed profiling of tasting room visitors, trip planning behaviors of wine tourists, itinerary patterns for wine tourists, the impact of tasting room fees on wine purchases, and wine tourism collaboration. Dan earned his Ph.D. at University of Minnesota and also holds an MBA from Michigan State University.

Abstract

In the U.S. and around the world, thousands of new wineries have opened in the last decade, most in areas not previously known for wine. The majority of these are small-scale and sell most of the wine produced out of tasting rooms, thus creating great opportunities for wine tourism. This rapid growth offers an important opportunity for rural areas, but only if the many new and inexperienced winery businesses can successfully navigate the challenges of operating both wine and tourism businesses. This study aims to help emerging wine tourism businesses by using non-hypothetical experiments to determine how different types of information impacts tourists’ willingness-to-pay for wine. We use Becker, DeGroot, and Marschak (BDM) experimental auctions to show that different types of information have different impacts on wine tourists’ willingness to pay for new and lesser-known varietals of wine.

Share

COinS
 

The Impact of Different Informational Messages on Wine Tourists’ Willingness to Pay: A Non-hypothetical Experiment

In the U.S. and around the world, thousands of new wineries have opened in the last decade, most in areas not previously known for wine. The majority of these are small-scale and sell most of the wine produced out of tasting rooms, thus creating great opportunities for wine tourism. This rapid growth offers an important opportunity for rural areas, but only if the many new and inexperienced winery businesses can successfully navigate the challenges of operating both wine and tourism businesses. This study aims to help emerging wine tourism businesses by using non-hypothetical experiments to determine how different types of information impacts tourists’ willingness-to-pay for wine. We use Becker, DeGroot, and Marschak (BDM) experimental auctions to show that different types of information have different impacts on wine tourists’ willingness to pay for new and lesser-known varietals of wine.