Presenter Bios

Elizabeth Cartier is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management at UMass-Amherst. Her research interests include: host/tourist behavior, tourism culture, and critical aspects of power and control. She is currently working on her dissertation, an ethnography focusing on tourism’s socio-cultural impact on a mountain ski community.

Rod Warnick, Ph.D.; is a professor of Hospitality and Tourism Management at the UMass- Amherst and has taught and conducted research there for the last 33 years. His research areas include consumer behavior issues on travel, tourism and recreation in addition to recent work on economic impacts of large regional events. His works have been published in the Journal of Travel Research; Journal of Recreation and Park Administration and Marketing; Event Management; and Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Research. He has received teaching and outreach research service awards over the past 33 years of service to the University and surrounding communities and has co-authored, Massachusetts Outdoors: For Our Common Good and Recreation Trends and Markets: The 21st Century.

Tiffany Jungyoung Shin, fourth year Ph.D. Candidate in the hospitality and tourism management department, Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst. Her research interests are in consumer moral value judgment, brand management, and food innovation.

Erfan Rezvani, first year PhD student in Hospitality and Tourism Management at UMASS. He has a bachelor and master’s degree in industrial engineering. Also, he has a master’s degree in Hospitality Business Management from University of Delaware. His research interests expand from medical tourism to service marketing.

Abstract

Propositions for Examining the Seasonality Construct in Tourism Settings

Abstract

The purpose of this conceptual study is to further develop our understanding of the seasonality construct as a predictor of tourist behavior. This study aims to explain and organize the tourism seasonality literature for a more thorough interpretation; examine how seasonality impacts consumer decision making focusing on the use of inbound and outbound marketing; and establish measurement tools that can help link seasonal destination consumer needs with actual behavior and internet search behavior. The contribution of this study is several thoroughly developed propositions to be used as a guide in further seasonality literature focusing on the measurement of the seasonality construct, specifically the tools to be utilized in seasonality empirical research; the types of seasonality as connected to traveler decision-making; the relationship between traveler search behavior, actual behavior, and seasonal changes; and the organization of seasonal terms in relation to seasonal activity.

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Propositions for Examining the Seasonality Construct in Tourism Settings

Propositions for Examining the Seasonality Construct in Tourism Settings

Abstract

The purpose of this conceptual study is to further develop our understanding of the seasonality construct as a predictor of tourist behavior. This study aims to explain and organize the tourism seasonality literature for a more thorough interpretation; examine how seasonality impacts consumer decision making focusing on the use of inbound and outbound marketing; and establish measurement tools that can help link seasonal destination consumer needs with actual behavior and internet search behavior. The contribution of this study is several thoroughly developed propositions to be used as a guide in further seasonality literature focusing on the measurement of the seasonality construct, specifically the tools to be utilized in seasonality empirical research; the types of seasonality as connected to traveler decision-making; the relationship between traveler search behavior, actual behavior, and seasonal changes; and the organization of seasonal terms in relation to seasonal activity.