Presenter Bios

Dr. Bridget Bordelon’s research interests include cultural tourism, tourism planning and policy, crises management, destination image, and cross-cultural perspectives on travel. She has worked as a research analyst at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan and traveled and taught with Boston University’s International Honors Program in Brazil, India, and South Africa. Additionally, Dr. Bordelon participated in the 2005 and 2008 UNO Innsbruck summer programs teaching Sports Tourism and International Tourism. Dr. Bordelon has received grant funding in the areas of cultural tourism and tourism economic impacts. She has published peer reviewed articles in a number of journals including Tourism Planning and Development, Tourism Analysis, Journal of Hospitality Marketing and Management, Journal of Vacation Marketing, and Journal of Convention and Event Tourism. She is a reviewer for Annals of Tourism Research and serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Leisure and Tourism Marketing. She has presented her research findings at the local, national, and international level. Dr. Bordelon a member of the Travel and Tourism Research Association (TTRA) and the International Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education (I-CHRIE).

Abstract

Approximately 15 million Americans have documented food allergies (CDC, 2013). While travel is becoming more accessible for many people around the world, food allergic sufferers and their families must deal with numerous obstacles and restrictions while traveling. This research paper explores the role of food allergy and policy in three primary areas of the hospitality and tourism industry: airlines, hotels and attractions. While there is limited existing research on food allergy in the context of restaurant safety, management, and education, there is no current study analyzing the associated perception of traveling with life threatening food allergies. Are food allergy sufferers and their families staying home, traveling less, or selecting specific types of trips under certain conditions? This preliminary exploratory research attempts to delve into this previous uncharted territory

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To Travel or Not to Travel: Exploring Food Allergy Policy in the Tourism and Hospitality Industry

Approximately 15 million Americans have documented food allergies (CDC, 2013). While travel is becoming more accessible for many people around the world, food allergic sufferers and their families must deal with numerous obstacles and restrictions while traveling. This research paper explores the role of food allergy and policy in three primary areas of the hospitality and tourism industry: airlines, hotels and attractions. While there is limited existing research on food allergy in the context of restaurant safety, management, and education, there is no current study analyzing the associated perception of traveling with life threatening food allergies. Are food allergy sufferers and their families staying home, traveling less, or selecting specific types of trips under certain conditions? This preliminary exploratory research attempts to delve into this previous uncharted territory