Presenter Bios

Dr. William C Murray is an Assistant Professor in the School of Hospitality, Food and Tourism Management at the University of Guelph in Canada. He specializes in hospitality operations management with a particular interest of the impacts made by and on people, both employees and customers. His research has explored employee motivation, engagement and organization commitment, as well as sensemaking and identify construction.

Abstract

This paper focuses on increasing our understanding of employee motivation by applying two different but complimentary measures to unpack motivational issues in hospitality employees: the Ten Factor Model (Hersey & Blanchard, 1969; Kovach, 1987) and Alderfer’s ERG theory (Alderfer, 1972). As the third study in a longitudinal body of work, this study will surface data collected between 2000 and 2016 within the Canadian lodging industry. The value of this work is two-fold. First, it maintains the detailed characteristics of Ten Factor Model while associating it with an established needs-based motivational theory centred on basic human’s realms of existence, social, and growth needs. Second, it attempts to unpack contextual issues by exploring shifts in self-ranked motivational needs over time and, more specifically, over varied economic circumstances.

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Exploring Self-Perceptions of Motivations in the Hospitality Industry

This paper focuses on increasing our understanding of employee motivation by applying two different but complimentary measures to unpack motivational issues in hospitality employees: the Ten Factor Model (Hersey & Blanchard, 1969; Kovach, 1987) and Alderfer’s ERG theory (Alderfer, 1972). As the third study in a longitudinal body of work, this study will surface data collected between 2000 and 2016 within the Canadian lodging industry. The value of this work is two-fold. First, it maintains the detailed characteristics of Ten Factor Model while associating it with an established needs-based motivational theory centred on basic human’s realms of existence, social, and growth needs. Second, it attempts to unpack contextual issues by exploring shifts in self-ranked motivational needs over time and, more specifically, over varied economic circumstances.