Presenter Bios

Rui Qi is a Doctoral Student in Hospitality Management at the School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management and Graduate Research Assistant in the SmartState Center of Economic Excellence in Tourism and Economic Development. Her research interests include sustainable development and financial analysis. Email: rqi@email.sc.edu

Kevin (Kam Fung) So is an Assistant Professor at the University of South Carolina in the School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management and a Research Associate in the SmartState Center of Economic Excellence in Tourism and Economic Development. His research interests include service marketing and brand management. Email:kevinso@hrsm.sc.edu

David A. Cárdenas is an Assistant Professor at the University of South Carolina in the School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management and a Research Associate in the SmartState Center of Economic Excellence in Tourism and Economic Development.His research interests include sustainable tourism development, community development, resident attitudes, and international tourism education. Email:dcardenas@hrsm.sc.edu

Simon Hudson is the endowed chair for the Center of Economic Excellence in Tourism and Economic Development at the University of South Carolina. Prior to working in academia, he spent several years working in the tourism industry in Europe. Dr. Hudson has written six books, and over 50 research articles, many of them focused on tourism marketing. Email: shudson@hrsm.sc.edu

Fang Meng is an Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina in the School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management and a Research Associate in the SmartState Center of Economic Excellence in Tourism and Economic Development. Her research interests include destination marketing, tourist behavior/experience, and international tourism. Email: fmeng@hrsm.sc.edu

Abstract

The classic social exchange theory associates residents’ level of support toward tourism events with their perceived positive and negative tourism impacts directly. However, the contradictory results reported in the literature suggest that such conceptualization may not fully capture the dynamics of the underlying relationships because the linkages between perceived costs and support are often vague. The purpose of this study is to introduce and investigate the role of tolerance in the formation of residents’ support toward tourism events. Results based on data collected from 296 residents at 6 different tourism events in a southeast capital city indicated that tolerance significantly mediated the relationship between perceived benefits and support, as well as perceived costs and support. Our study provides strong theoretical support and empirical findings for the inclusion of tolerance in evaluating residents’ support toward tourism events.

TTRA-2016-H-Tax-ShortAbstract.pdf (46 kB)
Short Abstract - H-Tax

TTRA-2016-H-Tax-CoverPage.pdf (54 kB)
Cover Page - H-Tax

Share

COinS
 

The Mediating Effects of Tolerance on Residents’ Support Toward Tourism Events

The classic social exchange theory associates residents’ level of support toward tourism events with their perceived positive and negative tourism impacts directly. However, the contradictory results reported in the literature suggest that such conceptualization may not fully capture the dynamics of the underlying relationships because the linkages between perceived costs and support are often vague. The purpose of this study is to introduce and investigate the role of tolerance in the formation of residents’ support toward tourism events. Results based on data collected from 296 residents at 6 different tourism events in a southeast capital city indicated that tolerance significantly mediated the relationship between perceived benefits and support, as well as perceived costs and support. Our study provides strong theoretical support and empirical findings for the inclusion of tolerance in evaluating residents’ support toward tourism events.