Presenter Bios

Bingjie Liu

Bingjie Liu is doctoral candidate in the Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management and a graduate research associate in the Tourism Crisis Management Initiative at the University of Florida. Her major research interests evolve tourism crisis management, with a specialty in crisis communication.

Ashley Schroeder

Ashley Schroeder, Ph. D. is the Managing Director of the Tourism Crisis Management Initiative and an Instructor in the Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management at the University of Florida, United States. Her research agenda focuses on tourism crisis management, with a particular emphasis on risk management.

Lori-Pennington-Gray

Lori Pennington-Gray, Ph.D. is the Director of the Tourism Crisis Management Initiative at the University of Florida, as well as a Professor in the Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management. Her major research initiative is in tourism crisis management and how destinations respond to crises.

Abstract

Abstract

Tourists’ risk perceptions and perceptions of safety are important topics within the tourism literature; however, the conceptual approaches to these concepts are inconsistent. Following the risk-as-feeling hypothesis, this study proposes that: perceived severity and perceived susceptibility could be considered as tourists’ cognitive risk perceptions; perceived safety could be considered as affective risk perceptions; efficacy beliefs should also be included within the theoretical framework. To clarify the underlying relationships between these variables, six conceptual models were developed and tested using data collected from 444 U.S. citizens. In the best fitting model, perceived safety mediated the relationship between one’s travel interest and travel intentions. This mediating relationship was moderated by cognitive risk perceptions and efficacy beliefs. The findings suggest that amplified cognitive risk perceptions may affect individuals’ perceived safety and subsequent travel decisions. Accordingly, destinations should promote safety measures for tourists during times of crisis and restore tourists’ confidence in the destination.

Keywords

Tourism Crisis Management; Perceived Safety; Risk Perceptions; Travel Decisions; Risk-as-Feeling Hypothesis

Share

COinS
 

Empirically Testing the Influence of Travel Safety Concerns: Examining Alternative Models

Abstract

Tourists’ risk perceptions and perceptions of safety are important topics within the tourism literature; however, the conceptual approaches to these concepts are inconsistent. Following the risk-as-feeling hypothesis, this study proposes that: perceived severity and perceived susceptibility could be considered as tourists’ cognitive risk perceptions; perceived safety could be considered as affective risk perceptions; efficacy beliefs should also be included within the theoretical framework. To clarify the underlying relationships between these variables, six conceptual models were developed and tested using data collected from 444 U.S. citizens. In the best fitting model, perceived safety mediated the relationship between one’s travel interest and travel intentions. This mediating relationship was moderated by cognitive risk perceptions and efficacy beliefs. The findings suggest that amplified cognitive risk perceptions may affect individuals’ perceived safety and subsequent travel decisions. Accordingly, destinations should promote safety measures for tourists during times of crisis and restore tourists’ confidence in the destination.

Keywords

Tourism Crisis Management; Perceived Safety; Risk Perceptions; Travel Decisions; Risk-as-Feeling Hypothesis