Presenter Information

Maryse Côté-HamelFollow

Presenter Bios

Dr. Maryse Côté-Hamel is an Assistant Professor of Consumer Sciences at Laval University. She is also a board member of TTRA Canada, and previously worked for eight years in marketing and tourism research for Québec City Tourism and two consulting companies: Ipsos Marketing and Zins Beauchesne and Associates.

Abstract

This two-study research investigates the influence of chronotype (i.e., sleep rhythms) and time-of-day on tourist behavioural intentions and overall satisfaction with a tourist destination. It demonstrates that morningness is positively related to the length of trip planning, the likelihood of visiting, the likelihood of recommending as well as the monetary value of spendings during the visit, and is negatively related to the frequency of visits to a tourist destination. Moreover, time-of-day moderates the influence of chronotype on the likelihood of visiting a tourist destination.

These findings have implications for tourists who may wish to synchronize the timing of their decisions and behaviours to their chronobiological nature. They also suggest using chronotype as a basis for segmentation. Adopting a different approach with morning and evening tourists could contribute to increase the “contextual perceived value” offered by tourist destinations to their travellers to create a sustainable non-price competitive advantage.

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An Investigation of the Influence of Chronotype and Time-of-Day on Travellers’ Behavioural Intentions and Overall Satisfaction With a Tourist Destination

This two-study research investigates the influence of chronotype (i.e., sleep rhythms) and time-of-day on tourist behavioural intentions and overall satisfaction with a tourist destination. It demonstrates that morningness is positively related to the length of trip planning, the likelihood of visiting, the likelihood of recommending as well as the monetary value of spendings during the visit, and is negatively related to the frequency of visits to a tourist destination. Moreover, time-of-day moderates the influence of chronotype on the likelihood of visiting a tourist destination.

These findings have implications for tourists who may wish to synchronize the timing of their decisions and behaviours to their chronobiological nature. They also suggest using chronotype as a basis for segmentation. Adopting a different approach with morning and evening tourists could contribute to increase the “contextual perceived value” offered by tourist destinations to their travellers to create a sustainable non-price competitive advantage.