Presenter Bios

Tom Griffin is an Assistant Professor at the Ted Rogers School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at Ryerson University, Toronto. His research interests include VFR travel, Virtual Reality, destination marketing, and volunteer tourism.

Daniel Guttentag is an Assistant Professor at the Ted Rogers School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at Ryerson University, Toronto. His research interests include Airbnb and the sharing economy, disruptive innovation, Virtual Reality, gambling, and volunteer tourism.

Abstract

The VFR Hosting Activity of Immigrant and Canadian-Born Residents

Abstract

This study compares the activity of immigrant and non-immigrant residents who host visiting friends and relatives (VFR). A survey of 2201 residents of the Greater Toronto Region asked about recent and general hosting behavior. Findings show that immigrant hosts are more likely to have hosted in previous three years. Further, immigrants who arrived most recently tended to have hosted higher proportions of non-Canadian and first time visitors. In addition, this same group were most likely to take vacation days in the last twelve months in order to host, and also took the most time to spend with their guests. This corresponded with a relatively high activity rate visiting local attractions with their guests. Implications for practitioners revolve around engaging (recent) immigrants as influencers and consumers of tourism in their communities.

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The VFR Hosting Activity of Immigrant and Canadian-Born Residents

The VFR Hosting Activity of Immigrant and Canadian-Born Residents

Abstract

This study compares the activity of immigrant and non-immigrant residents who host visiting friends and relatives (VFR). A survey of 2201 residents of the Greater Toronto Region asked about recent and general hosting behavior. Findings show that immigrant hosts are more likely to have hosted in previous three years. Further, immigrants who arrived most recently tended to have hosted higher proportions of non-Canadian and first time visitors. In addition, this same group were most likely to take vacation days in the last twelve months in order to host, and also took the most time to spend with their guests. This corresponded with a relatively high activity rate visiting local attractions with their guests. Implications for practitioners revolve around engaging (recent) immigrants as influencers and consumers of tourism in their communities.