Presenter Bios

Elizabeth has held management positions in both the restaurant and hotel industries. She has also served as the executive director of the AH&LA Information Center. She holds a BA from the University of Pittsburgh, an MS in Hospitality Management from the University of Houston where she is currently a PhD candidate.

Abstract

With the changing landscapes of online research, netnography has shifted to fit the needs of researchers in hospitality and tourism. This has left a void behind, however, for traditional ethnographic methodologies. This study reviews past netnographic research in hospitality and tourism and finds three major differentiating points: 1. online community definitions, 2. data collection methodologies, and 3. ethics in research. Through discussing the distinctions between ethnography and netnography, this research shows the availability of two distinct qualitative methodologies. As netnography grows and changes, traditional ethnography should not be lost in the process. Ethnographic principles grounded in the foundation of anthropological doctrines should remain important and distinct from netnography. The ability to use the diverse tools in the qualitative toolbox will help hospitality and tourism researchers understand the transforming marketplace.

Cover Page Netnography.docx (20 kB)
Cover Page

Short Abstract Netnography.docx (20 kB)
Short Abstract

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A Changing Netnographic Landscape: Is There a Place for Online Ethnography in Hospitality and Tourism?

With the changing landscapes of online research, netnography has shifted to fit the needs of researchers in hospitality and tourism. This has left a void behind, however, for traditional ethnographic methodologies. This study reviews past netnographic research in hospitality and tourism and finds three major differentiating points: 1. online community definitions, 2. data collection methodologies, and 3. ethics in research. Through discussing the distinctions between ethnography and netnography, this research shows the availability of two distinct qualitative methodologies. As netnography grows and changes, traditional ethnography should not be lost in the process. Ethnographic principles grounded in the foundation of anthropological doctrines should remain important and distinct from netnography. The ability to use the diverse tools in the qualitative toolbox will help hospitality and tourism researchers understand the transforming marketplace.