Type

Poster

Description

Digital Scholarship is an important and growing field in which librarians embed themselves in scholarly projects, not just as providers of a service but as partners and collaborators throughout the life-cycle of research. Instead of acting as consultants on the periphery of the research process, librarians can be involved at every stage of the process. They bring valuable skills to the table in terms of technological expertise, subject and research knowledge, preservation considerations, and dissemination pathways. The University of Connecticut Library has consciously sought to grow its digital scholarship program and has undertaken several projects in the last couple of years that embody this commitment to non-traditional forms of scholarship. This poster will highlight one such project.

This poster will explore a digital scholarship project on Puerto Rican citizenship, entitled Puerto Rico Citizenship Archives: A History of the Extension of U.S. Citizenship to Puerto Rico. The project is intended to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Puerto Rican citizenship rights and is part of other commemorative events planned to take place throughout 2017. The University of Connecticut Library has made efforts to expand their digital scholarship services, and Jennifer Snow, Digital Scholarship Librarian, and Professor Charles R. Venator, Political Science and the Institute of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies, collaborated to create this Omeka-platform project. The poster will showcase not only the research itself, but the innovation that can result when librarians and scholars come together as collaborators and peers.
Partnership is a key component of this poster session. Not only has the library partnered with an individual faculty member, but also with the Hartford Public Library, the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, the Universidad del Este, and the Universidad de Puerto Rico. The latter will be producing a Spanish-language version of the Puerto Rico Citizenship Archives. As scholars look for new avenues to publish their research beyond the traditional book, librarians have a exciting opportunity to lead the way.

Keywords

digital scholarship

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May 12th, 3:00 PM

Collaborators and Partners: Librarians and Digital Scholarship

Fireplace Lounge

Digital Scholarship is an important and growing field in which librarians embed themselves in scholarly projects, not just as providers of a service but as partners and collaborators throughout the life-cycle of research. Instead of acting as consultants on the periphery of the research process, librarians can be involved at every stage of the process. They bring valuable skills to the table in terms of technological expertise, subject and research knowledge, preservation considerations, and dissemination pathways. The University of Connecticut Library has consciously sought to grow its digital scholarship program and has undertaken several projects in the last couple of years that embody this commitment to non-traditional forms of scholarship. This poster will highlight one such project.

This poster will explore a digital scholarship project on Puerto Rican citizenship, entitled Puerto Rico Citizenship Archives: A History of the Extension of U.S. Citizenship to Puerto Rico. The project is intended to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Puerto Rican citizenship rights and is part of other commemorative events planned to take place throughout 2017. The University of Connecticut Library has made efforts to expand their digital scholarship services, and Jennifer Snow, Digital Scholarship Librarian, and Professor Charles R. Venator, Political Science and the Institute of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies, collaborated to create this Omeka-platform project. The poster will showcase not only the research itself, but the innovation that can result when librarians and scholars come together as collaborators and peers.
Partnership is a key component of this poster session. Not only has the library partnered with an individual faculty member, but also with the Hartford Public Library, the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, the Universidad del Este, and the Universidad de Puerto Rico. The latter will be producing a Spanish-language version of the Puerto Rico Citizenship Archives. As scholars look for new avenues to publish their research beyond the traditional book, librarians have a exciting opportunity to lead the way.

 

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