Publication Date

2018

Journal or Book Title

The Journal of Politics

Abstract

It has long been suggested that gender stereotyping undercuts support for female candidates, yet a growing number of studies—including several analyses of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign—find limited evidence of such effects. By contrast, I find consistent evidence of voter gender bias using an alternative approach based on perceptions of group favoritism. Using new survey measures included on a nationally representative panel survey fielded during the 2008 US presidential primaries, I find that many citizens perceive female elected officials as likely to steer government resources toward women, a behavior that most evaluate negatively. Moreover, fear of gender favoritism predicts opposition to Clinton throughout the 2008 Democratic primary campaign, as well as in a hypothetical general election matchup with the Republican nominee.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1086/697123

Pages

786-799

Volume

80

Issue

3

License

UMass Amherst Open Access Policy

151137Appendix.pdf (286 kB)
Appendixes A-C

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