Event Title

Concurrent Sessions A: Dam Removal I - The Purpose And Need For Hydraulic Modeling Studies for Dam Removal Planning, Design, and Permitting?

Location

Construction & Engineering Hall, Oregon State University

Start Date

25-6-2013 11:00 AM

End Date

25-6-2013 11:20 AM

Description

Hydraulic modeling studies are a typical component of dam removal planning, design, and permitting studies. Hydraulic modeling can represent an important component of the dam removal planning and design process, but the need for hydraulic modeling studies should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The bases for performing hydraulic modeling as part of dam removal studies includes understanding existing and proposed flows and providing information for use in related project studies, such as changes in upstream water surface profiles (e.g., flooding), evaluation of sediment transport, potential impacts to adjacent infrastructure, upstream fish passage, and restoration of the formerly inundated reach of the watercourse following dam removal. Given that most dam removal projects occur on run-of-river dams, it is apparent by inspection that potential impacts that may result from dam removal are largely related to conditions within the currently impounded reach of the watercourse. In the absence of potential impacts that may result from changes in the hydraulic regime in the impounded reach of the watercourse following dam removal, such as the presence of infrastructure and/or large volumes of accumulated sediment, hydraulic modeling may not be necessary. Identified problems with hydraulic modeling as part of dam removal studies include the inability to calibrate or validate the hydraulic model for the reach of primary interest (i.e., the currently impounded reach), uncertainty regarding the geometry of the reach of primary interest following dam removal, uncertainty associated with dependent studies, including sediment transport and bridge scour analyses, and evaluation of upstream fish passage. This paper presents case histories of a six completed dam removal projects, including projects were hydraulic modeling was and was not performed, and discusses the relative merits of the hydraulic modeling work at each site.

Comments

Michael Chelminski is an environmental consultant and Principal at Stantec Consulting Services Inc. The focus of his work is on fisheries habitat restoration through improved upstream fish passage. The current focus of his work is decommissioning of legacy infrastructure (i.e., dam removal) as a means to improve access for indigenous fish to their historic habitats. Michael also scopes, evaluates, and designs upstream and downstream fish passage projects in the United States and Canada. He is a charter member of the ASCE-EWRI/AFS-BES Ad Hoc Committee on Fish Passage, a fisherman, has a MS in engineering from Utah State University and a BS in engineering from the University of Connecticut, and is a licensed professional engineer.

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Jun 25th, 11:00 AM Jun 25th, 11:20 AM

Concurrent Sessions A: Dam Removal I - The Purpose And Need For Hydraulic Modeling Studies for Dam Removal Planning, Design, and Permitting?

Construction & Engineering Hall, Oregon State University

Hydraulic modeling studies are a typical component of dam removal planning, design, and permitting studies. Hydraulic modeling can represent an important component of the dam removal planning and design process, but the need for hydraulic modeling studies should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The bases for performing hydraulic modeling as part of dam removal studies includes understanding existing and proposed flows and providing information for use in related project studies, such as changes in upstream water surface profiles (e.g., flooding), evaluation of sediment transport, potential impacts to adjacent infrastructure, upstream fish passage, and restoration of the formerly inundated reach of the watercourse following dam removal. Given that most dam removal projects occur on run-of-river dams, it is apparent by inspection that potential impacts that may result from dam removal are largely related to conditions within the currently impounded reach of the watercourse. In the absence of potential impacts that may result from changes in the hydraulic regime in the impounded reach of the watercourse following dam removal, such as the presence of infrastructure and/or large volumes of accumulated sediment, hydraulic modeling may not be necessary. Identified problems with hydraulic modeling as part of dam removal studies include the inability to calibrate or validate the hydraulic model for the reach of primary interest (i.e., the currently impounded reach), uncertainty regarding the geometry of the reach of primary interest following dam removal, uncertainty associated with dependent studies, including sediment transport and bridge scour analyses, and evaluation of upstream fish passage. This paper presents case histories of a six completed dam removal projects, including projects were hydraulic modeling was and was not performed, and discusses the relative merits of the hydraulic modeling work at each site.