Event Title

Concurrent Sessions C: Fish Screening At Water Diversions I - Screening Large Irrigation Diversions, Lessons Learned From Screens That Have Worked and Not Worked as Planned

Location

Agriculture Leaders Theater, Oregon State University

Start Date

25-6-2013 11:00 AM

End Date

25-6-2013 11:20 AM

Description

Screening water diversions located on natural channels is and important link in sustaining a native fishery. Migratory species can be especially vulnerable to unscreened diversions as they often move long distances yearly exposing them to multiple diversions. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) fish screen criteria has become the standard for screening both anadromous and non-anadromous fish in the western United States. Both designing and maintaining a large fish screen to meet hydraulic criteria can be challenging. This paper covers a number of case studies and research that highlight important lessons learned in the design, operation and maintenance of larger fish screens. Case studies will be used to illustrate many important design issues on screen layout, orientation to channel flow, achieving flow conditions that assist with debris management, dealing with biofouling and use of isolation gates. Post-construction corrective measures that can be implemented when screen flow conditions don’t quite turn out as planned are also presented. Screens located in California, Nevada and Colorado are discussed.

Comments

Brent Mefford is a hydraulic/fish passage engineer at the Bureau of Reclamation's Technical Service Center in Denver, Colorado. He has 30+ yeas experience designing and researching fish passage and screening.

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Jun 25th, 11:00 AM Jun 25th, 11:20 AM

Concurrent Sessions C: Fish Screening At Water Diversions I - Screening Large Irrigation Diversions, Lessons Learned From Screens That Have Worked and Not Worked as Planned

Agriculture Leaders Theater, Oregon State University

Screening water diversions located on natural channels is and important link in sustaining a native fishery. Migratory species can be especially vulnerable to unscreened diversions as they often move long distances yearly exposing them to multiple diversions. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) fish screen criteria has become the standard for screening both anadromous and non-anadromous fish in the western United States. Both designing and maintaining a large fish screen to meet hydraulic criteria can be challenging. This paper covers a number of case studies and research that highlight important lessons learned in the design, operation and maintenance of larger fish screens. Case studies will be used to illustrate many important design issues on screen layout, orientation to channel flow, achieving flow conditions that assist with debris management, dealing with biofouling and use of isolation gates. Post-construction corrective measures that can be implemented when screen flow conditions don’t quite turn out as planned are also presented. Screens located in California, Nevada and Colorado are discussed.