Event Title

Concurrent Sessions C: Ecological Consequences of Partial Passage - Fish Passage Policy in Washington: The Cost of Caution

Location

Agriculture Leaders Theater, Oregon State University

Start Date

26-6-2013 1:30 PM

End Date

26-6-2013 1:50 PM

Description

Thousands of culverts continue to be replaced in Washington state according to established fish passage assessment protocols and requirements of resource agencies. These requirements for fish passage extend to situations for resident species that may be marginally important or in the case of invasive species even detrimental from an ecological perspective. The monetary costs of these decisions are born by businesses, private parties and government agencies responsible for road infrastructure. Case histories are provided to demonstrate how fish passage policies in Washington are implemented. A simple formulaic approach is provided to contrast fisheries benefits with cost of culvert replacement.

Comments

Phil Peterson is a professional fisheries biologist with 30 years of experience in Pacific Northwest water and land use issues. He has a broad background in stream and riparian ecology and geomorphic processes. Peterson has experience in research, conservation and management at project and program levels in both the private and public sectors.

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Jun 26th, 1:30 PM Jun 26th, 1:50 PM

Concurrent Sessions C: Ecological Consequences of Partial Passage - Fish Passage Policy in Washington: The Cost of Caution

Agriculture Leaders Theater, Oregon State University

Thousands of culverts continue to be replaced in Washington state according to established fish passage assessment protocols and requirements of resource agencies. These requirements for fish passage extend to situations for resident species that may be marginally important or in the case of invasive species even detrimental from an ecological perspective. The monetary costs of these decisions are born by businesses, private parties and government agencies responsible for road infrastructure. Case histories are provided to demonstrate how fish passage policies in Washington are implemented. A simple formulaic approach is provided to contrast fisheries benefits with cost of culvert replacement.