Event Title

Concurrent Sessions D: Downstream Sturgeon Passage - Blade Strike Survival and Hydrokinetic Turbine Passage: Results of Testing with White Sturgeon

Location

Agriculture Science Theater, Oregon State University

Start Date

26-6-2013 10:40 AM

End Date

26-6-2013 11:00 AM

Description

The installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in riverine habitats may impact local and migratory fish populations. One of the primary concerns associated with hydrokinetic projects is the potential for fish to be struck and injured or killed by turbine blades. To address this issue, we conducted laboratory evaluations of turbine blade strike mortality and fish entrainment through hydrokinetic turbines. The blade strike studies were conducted with trout and sturgeon and evaluated survival and injury for various fish lengths, blade leading edge thicknesses, and strike velocities. The resulting data set allows for blade strike mortality rates to be estimated for most teleost species and sturgeons for a wide range of turbine designs and operating conditions for both conventional hydro and hydrokinetic units. Flume testing with three hydrokinetic turbine designs provided survival and behavioral data for fish approaching and passing through the blade sweep of each unit. These tests included an evaluation of white sturgeon juveniles with an axial-flow, ducted turbine. The results of these studies have produced valuable data that can be used to assess the potential for sturgeon to be entrained and injured when encountering hydrokinetic turbines in the field.

Comments

Dr. Jacobson is a Senior Project Manager in EPRI’s Waterpower Program, which encompasses conventional hydropower as well as marine and hydrokinetic technologies. His professional work over the past 25 years has focused on environmental assessment in aquatic ecosystems. Prior to joining EPRI in September, 2009, he worked in the environmental consulting arena, most recently for 13 years as the founder and principal scientist of Langhei Ecology, LLC. Dr. Jacobson’s specialty is design, analysis, and interpretation of monitoring and assessment programs to support environmental decision-making. Since 1998, Dr. Jacobson has been a faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches a graduate course on ecological assessment. He holds Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in oceanography and limnology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a B.A. degree in biology from Cornell University.

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Jun 26th, 10:40 AM Jun 26th, 11:00 AM

Concurrent Sessions D: Downstream Sturgeon Passage - Blade Strike Survival and Hydrokinetic Turbine Passage: Results of Testing with White Sturgeon

Agriculture Science Theater, Oregon State University

The installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in riverine habitats may impact local and migratory fish populations. One of the primary concerns associated with hydrokinetic projects is the potential for fish to be struck and injured or killed by turbine blades. To address this issue, we conducted laboratory evaluations of turbine blade strike mortality and fish entrainment through hydrokinetic turbines. The blade strike studies were conducted with trout and sturgeon and evaluated survival and injury for various fish lengths, blade leading edge thicknesses, and strike velocities. The resulting data set allows for blade strike mortality rates to be estimated for most teleost species and sturgeons for a wide range of turbine designs and operating conditions for both conventional hydro and hydrokinetic units. Flume testing with three hydrokinetic turbine designs provided survival and behavioral data for fish approaching and passing through the blade sweep of each unit. These tests included an evaluation of white sturgeon juveniles with an axial-flow, ducted turbine. The results of these studies have produced valuable data that can be used to assess the potential for sturgeon to be entrained and injured when encountering hydrokinetic turbines in the field.