Event Title

Concurrent Sessions C: Ecological Consequences of Partial Passage - A Probabilistic Model for Assessing Passage Performance of Coastal Cutthroat Trout Through Corrugated Metal Culverts

Location

Agriculture Leaders Theater, Oregon State University

Start Date

26-6-2013 1:50 PM

End Date

26-6-2013 2:10 PM

Description

We conducted a series of volitional trials with wild-caught resident coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki clarki in a 12.2 m long, 1.8 m diameter culvert test facility to develop a probabilistic model for predicting rates of upstream passage over a wide range of average velocities. Results of passage trials indicated that the percentage of fish attempting passage and percentage of fish successfully passing decreased as the trial target average velocity increased. At our highest trial average velocity of 2.4 m∙s-1, 31% of test fish that chose to attempt passage passed after two nights of observation. Passage performance was generally better for larger fish, but this pattern was only statistically significant for a single trial (1.9 m∙s-1). Fish ascended through the pipe more quickly as velocity increased. At higher test velocities fish favored the left side of the pipe (looking downstream), which contained a reduced velocity zone created by the slightly oblique orientation of culvert corrugations. Our data provide the basis for a logistic model describing the probability of passage for cutthroat trout through bare corrugated metal culverts with no outlet drop. Empirical studies testing fish passage such as this one can inform culvert assessment protocols currently in use.

Comments

Ryan Simmons is a fisheries biologist with nine years of experience studying aspects of salmonid ecology, including early life history diversity and estimates in abundance and survival. He is also experienced in using PIT technology for juvenile and adult salmonids, as well as methods for assessing native trout and amphibian distribution in riverine and lacustrine systems. Simmons is familiar with natural resource issues common to the forest, hydroelectric, and fishing industries.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 26th, 1:50 PM Jun 26th, 2:10 PM

Concurrent Sessions C: Ecological Consequences of Partial Passage - A Probabilistic Model for Assessing Passage Performance of Coastal Cutthroat Trout Through Corrugated Metal Culverts

Agriculture Leaders Theater, Oregon State University

We conducted a series of volitional trials with wild-caught resident coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki clarki in a 12.2 m long, 1.8 m diameter culvert test facility to develop a probabilistic model for predicting rates of upstream passage over a wide range of average velocities. Results of passage trials indicated that the percentage of fish attempting passage and percentage of fish successfully passing decreased as the trial target average velocity increased. At our highest trial average velocity of 2.4 m∙s-1, 31% of test fish that chose to attempt passage passed after two nights of observation. Passage performance was generally better for larger fish, but this pattern was only statistically significant for a single trial (1.9 m∙s-1). Fish ascended through the pipe more quickly as velocity increased. At higher test velocities fish favored the left side of the pipe (looking downstream), which contained a reduced velocity zone created by the slightly oblique orientation of culvert corrugations. Our data provide the basis for a logistic model describing the probability of passage for cutthroat trout through bare corrugated metal culverts with no outlet drop. Empirical studies testing fish passage such as this one can inform culvert assessment protocols currently in use.