Event Title

Concurrent Sessions C: A Cooperative Approach to Solving Fish Habitat Recovery - Ode to Fin, Feathers and Frogs: A Multi-Facet Approach to Fish Passage Through an Oregon Marsh

Location

Oregon State University

Start Date

27-6-2013 3:10 PM

End Date

27-6-2013 3:30 PM

Description

The USFWS and Stantec are investigating the restoration or enhancement of a portion of the Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge north of Chiloquin OR. The conceptual design of the wetland and riverine habitat restoration is a complex project with a variety of very unique parameters. The land form of the Klamath marsh was primarily formed by the eruption of Crater Lake’s Mount Mazama. The Euro-American agricultural period drained much of the Marsh and created a series of drainage and irrigation channels with structures that inhibit fish passage. The marsh drainage that has occurred during the agricultural period has also limited the beneficial habitat for many wildlife species, including the prelisted Oregon Spotted Frog. The project goals and objects are numerous and include restoring the natural hydrology of the marsh. Other goals are related to fisheries, wildlife and achieving the optimal land use. It is important for the USFWS to be able to balance many conflicting goals and objectives to gain a consensus with the project stakeholders. The design team has been working with the USFWS to identify valley and streams of reference sections of the Williamson River to serve as and design surrogate to enhance the hydrology and habitat of the marsh. The project location is located in a transition of valley types and varies between losing and gaining stream reaches. A landscape based approach as evaluated concept designs for both a single threaded design reach of the Williamson River as well as an anastomosing River reach. Alternative approaches have been evaluated to accomplish the fish passage goals as well as the other project goals and objectives. Future funding and design will allow for the investigation and implementation to achieve fish passage through this anastomosing reach of the Williamson River on the Klamath Marsh NWR.

Comments

David Bidelspach is a Stream Restoration Specialist and Engineer with Stantec Consulting. Mr. Bidelspach has been involved with the restoration and improvement of various water courses that improved fish passage and well as some projects to inhibit fish passage.

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Jun 27th, 3:10 PM Jun 27th, 3:30 PM

Concurrent Sessions C: A Cooperative Approach to Solving Fish Habitat Recovery - Ode to Fin, Feathers and Frogs: A Multi-Facet Approach to Fish Passage Through an Oregon Marsh

Oregon State University

The USFWS and Stantec are investigating the restoration or enhancement of a portion of the Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge north of Chiloquin OR. The conceptual design of the wetland and riverine habitat restoration is a complex project with a variety of very unique parameters. The land form of the Klamath marsh was primarily formed by the eruption of Crater Lake’s Mount Mazama. The Euro-American agricultural period drained much of the Marsh and created a series of drainage and irrigation channels with structures that inhibit fish passage. The marsh drainage that has occurred during the agricultural period has also limited the beneficial habitat for many wildlife species, including the prelisted Oregon Spotted Frog. The project goals and objects are numerous and include restoring the natural hydrology of the marsh. Other goals are related to fisheries, wildlife and achieving the optimal land use. It is important for the USFWS to be able to balance many conflicting goals and objectives to gain a consensus with the project stakeholders. The design team has been working with the USFWS to identify valley and streams of reference sections of the Williamson River to serve as and design surrogate to enhance the hydrology and habitat of the marsh. The project location is located in a transition of valley types and varies between losing and gaining stream reaches. A landscape based approach as evaluated concept designs for both a single threaded design reach of the Williamson River as well as an anastomosing River reach. Alternative approaches have been evaluated to accomplish the fish passage goals as well as the other project goals and objectives. Future funding and design will allow for the investigation and implementation to achieve fish passage through this anastomosing reach of the Williamson River on the Klamath Marsh NWR.