Event Title

Concurrent Sessions C: Cooperative Approach to Solving Fish Habitat Recovery - Developing a Comprehensive Plan for Protecting Fish Habitat Within an Entire Drainage Basin

Location

Oregon State University

Start Date

27-6-2013 3:50 PM

End Date

27-6-2013 4:10 PM

Description

The Smith Creek and Shields River drainages in the 1960's through the 1980's was was in private ownership and subsequently heavily roaded and harvested. The impacts of this activity were still being heavily felt in the aquatic environment at the beginning of the 1990's when the Gallatin National Forest acquired many of the private lands. In 1990, the Forest embarked in planning and restoration for the restoration of the aquatic and terrestial environments using a comprehensive approach to restoration. This approach included planning and decision making for public and administrative needed access using a minimum transportation system. Implementation of the decisions has included long term management of the transportation system, decommissioning of the excess roads and trails, providing for public access and making improvements to the transportation system that includes aquatic crossing improvements and reducing sediment production. The restoration plan is still being implemented today.

Comments

Jonathan Kempff is the Forest Engineer with the Gallatin National Forest and has over 30 years of engineering experience developing, maintaining, managing, and restoring National Forest System roads and trails.

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Jun 27th, 3:50 PM Jun 27th, 4:10 PM

Concurrent Sessions C: Cooperative Approach to Solving Fish Habitat Recovery - Developing a Comprehensive Plan for Protecting Fish Habitat Within an Entire Drainage Basin

Oregon State University

The Smith Creek and Shields River drainages in the 1960's through the 1980's was was in private ownership and subsequently heavily roaded and harvested. The impacts of this activity were still being heavily felt in the aquatic environment at the beginning of the 1990's when the Gallatin National Forest acquired many of the private lands. In 1990, the Forest embarked in planning and restoration for the restoration of the aquatic and terrestial environments using a comprehensive approach to restoration. This approach included planning and decision making for public and administrative needed access using a minimum transportation system. Implementation of the decisions has included long term management of the transportation system, decommissioning of the excess roads and trails, providing for public access and making improvements to the transportation system that includes aquatic crossing improvements and reducing sediment production. The restoration plan is still being implemented today.