Event Title

Session A2: Optimization of Adjusted Barrier Management to Improve Glass Eel Migration at Estuarine Barriers

Location

Groningen, The Netherlands

Event Website

http://fishpassage.umass.edu/

Start Date

22-6-2015 3:15 PM

End Date

22-6-2015 3:40 PM

Description

Abstract:

Estuarine barriers may significantly reduce the upstream migration of diadromous fish species like the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.). Previous research showed that limited barrier opening during tidal rise was a cost-efficient and effective mitigation option to improve upstream glass eel migration, without significant intrusion of sea water. We optimised this adjusted barrier management to improve eel passage at a three different tidal barriers in Flanders, Belgium, blocking the most important migration routes for glass eel in Flanders. Specifically, three hypotheses were tested.

The first hypothesis analysed the impact of the number of barriers opened on the upstream glass eel migration. The second hypothesis evaluated the relation between the size of the barrier opening and glass eel migration.

Finally, we tested whether the suggested adjusted barrier management may lead to a significant increase in conductivity. Increased opening of one barrier appeared more efficient than opening several barriers slightly. Conductivity increased during periods of extreme drought and at base flow, but decreased within 24h after the first peak flow. This indicates that adjusted barrier management does not entail salt intrusion, as long as this management is not applied in extremely dry periods. Since the adjusted barrier management is easily implemented and could be applied on numerous tidal barriers, the presented results may contribute to restoration of eel populations worldwide and be of interest to a wide range of river managers and stakeholders.

Comments

Presenting Author Bio: Ans Mouton obtained his degree in Environmental Engineering at Ghent University in 2004. Between October 2004 and October 2008, he was a PhD student at the Department of Applied Ecology and Environmental Biology of the Faculty of Bioscience Engineering of Ghent University under the supervision of Prof. dr. ir. Peter Goethals. His research was supported by Prof. dr. Bernard De Baets of the Department of Applied Mathematics, Biometry and Process Control of the Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.

As a BOF grant holder he developed species distribution models for fish and invertebrates in rivers. He taught various courses and practical exercises, while he also tutored several Master theses. Ans Mouton presented his work on several international conferences during platform and poster presentations. In 2006 he was awarded the Best Student Paper and Presentation Award on the iEMSs Biennial Congress (Burlington, USA). He is the author of several peer-reviewed publications in international journals and cooperated with research institutes and universities worldwide.

Since October 2008, Ans Mouton works at the Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO) as research scientist Management Aquatic Species and Ecosystems. He was the project leader of different Flemish research projects and participates in several European research projects, such as the COST 626 European Aquatic Modelling Network programme and the Interreg IVB programme ‘Living North Sea’.

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Jun 22nd, 3:15 PM Jun 22nd, 3:40 PM

Session A2: Optimization of Adjusted Barrier Management to Improve Glass Eel Migration at Estuarine Barriers

Groningen, The Netherlands

Abstract:

Estuarine barriers may significantly reduce the upstream migration of diadromous fish species like the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.). Previous research showed that limited barrier opening during tidal rise was a cost-efficient and effective mitigation option to improve upstream glass eel migration, without significant intrusion of sea water. We optimised this adjusted barrier management to improve eel passage at a three different tidal barriers in Flanders, Belgium, blocking the most important migration routes for glass eel in Flanders. Specifically, three hypotheses were tested.

The first hypothesis analysed the impact of the number of barriers opened on the upstream glass eel migration. The second hypothesis evaluated the relation between the size of the barrier opening and glass eel migration.

Finally, we tested whether the suggested adjusted barrier management may lead to a significant increase in conductivity. Increased opening of one barrier appeared more efficient than opening several barriers slightly. Conductivity increased during periods of extreme drought and at base flow, but decreased within 24h after the first peak flow. This indicates that adjusted barrier management does not entail salt intrusion, as long as this management is not applied in extremely dry periods. Since the adjusted barrier management is easily implemented and could be applied on numerous tidal barriers, the presented results may contribute to restoration of eel populations worldwide and be of interest to a wide range of river managers and stakeholders.

https://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2015/June22/96