Event Title

Session C6: Efficiency of a Vertically Oriented Bristle Pass for Upstream Moving European Eel (Anguilla anguilla) and River Lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) at an Experimental Crump Weir

Location

Groningen, The Netherlands

Event Website

http://fishpassage.umass.edu/

Start Date

23-6-2015 4:45 PM

End Date

23-6-2015 5:00 PM

Description

Abstract:

Globally, populations of diadromous anguilliform fish, such as eel and lamprey, have experienced substantial declines, partly as a result of habitat fragmentation caused by river infrastructure. In the UK, a new configuration of bristle pass (sidemounted and vertically oriented) has been developed to help upstream moving European eel (Anguilla anguilla) negotiate low-head structural barriers such as gauging weirs. However, the efficiency of this type of anguilliform pass remains untested, despite regional implementation and recommendation of nationwide deployment in England and Wales. This study investigated the behaviour of European eel and river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) as they attempted to pass an unmodified (control), or modified (treatment - with bristle passes installed) Crump weir, under experimental conditions. The experiment was repeated under three hydraulic regimes (low, medium and high velocity) that represent a range of conditions frequently encountered at Crump weirs in the field. Passage and delay were quantified and the influence of hydraulic regime and treatment assessed. Both species were highly motivated to explore their surroundings and move upstream during the trials. Bristle passes helped European eel and river lamprey pass the Crump weir, although interspecific variation in efficiency was evident. Passage metrics and behavioral reasons for interspecific differences are presented and discussed, as is the need for further research on design optimisation.

Comments

Presenting Author Bio: Jim Kerr undertook an integrated Masters in Oceanography at the University of Southampton between 2004 and 2008. After graduating he worked for a small marine environmental consultancy (Seastar Survey Ltd.) undertaking a range of work including EIAs for the oil and gas industry and acoustic noise pollution monitoring for offshore wind farm projects. He then switched to focus of freshwater aquatic ecology and is currently in the final stages of undertaking of a PhD focussing on fish passage and the behavioural response of fish to complex hydraulics.

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Jun 23rd, 4:45 PM Jun 23rd, 5:00 PM

Session C6: Efficiency of a Vertically Oriented Bristle Pass for Upstream Moving European Eel (Anguilla anguilla) and River Lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) at an Experimental Crump Weir

Groningen, The Netherlands

Abstract:

Globally, populations of diadromous anguilliform fish, such as eel and lamprey, have experienced substantial declines, partly as a result of habitat fragmentation caused by river infrastructure. In the UK, a new configuration of bristle pass (sidemounted and vertically oriented) has been developed to help upstream moving European eel (Anguilla anguilla) negotiate low-head structural barriers such as gauging weirs. However, the efficiency of this type of anguilliform pass remains untested, despite regional implementation and recommendation of nationwide deployment in England and Wales. This study investigated the behaviour of European eel and river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) as they attempted to pass an unmodified (control), or modified (treatment - with bristle passes installed) Crump weir, under experimental conditions. The experiment was repeated under three hydraulic regimes (low, medium and high velocity) that represent a range of conditions frequently encountered at Crump weirs in the field. Passage and delay were quantified and the influence of hydraulic regime and treatment assessed. Both species were highly motivated to explore their surroundings and move upstream during the trials. Bristle passes helped European eel and river lamprey pass the Crump weir, although interspecific variation in efficiency was evident. Passage metrics and behavioral reasons for interspecific differences are presented and discussed, as is the need for further research on design optimisation.

https://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2015/June23/43