Event Title

Session A6: Telemetric Survey of Upstream and Downstream Migrating Species at the River Elbe, Germany

Location

Groningen, The Netherlands

Event Website

http://fishpassage.umass.edu/

Start Date

23-6-2015 4:15 PM

End Date

23-6-2015 4:30 PM

Description

Abstract:

The detection of movement patterns of species in rivers can be realised by acoustic telemetry. From 2012 till 2013 a survey on migrating species by means of telemetry was conducted in the river Elbe focussing on following questions: How do successful upstream migrating fish behave after swimming through a fish pass? To what extend is a direct downstream migration taking place? The investigation area is located 30 km upstream the city of Hamburg in the 400 m width headwater of the weir Geesthacht. The migration barrier is equipped with a new double slot pass at the north bank and a natural like channel (since 1996) at the south. 6 anadromous (n=161) and 10 potamodromous (n=127) species were tagged with an acoustic transmitter after passing the fish ways successfully. Additionally a group of tagged Atlantic salmon smolts (n=76) were released 8 km upstream the weir. 21 hydrophones were installed along the river banks over a section of 4 km upstream the weir to detect the movement patterns of the released specimens. Very good redetection quotes were achieved: 68% of anadromous as well as 65% of potamodromous species and 95% of salmon smolts were redetected.

Several typal behaviour patterns have been observed: No matter, if the tagged fish were released at the head of the old or the new fish pass, the upstream migrating anadromous specimens tend to follow the current flow to pass the investigation area very fast and in beeline. Also the salmon smolts migrated immediately in just 4 hours throughout the headwater and pass the weir. Not even local turbulences e.g. caused by a pumped storage plant could affect this movement patterns. In contrast potamodromous fish show a remarkable unsteady cruising behaviour and just onethird continued their upstream migration along the same river bank where they had been released.

Comments

Presenting Author Bio: Juliane Klan, born in 25.08.1986 in Templin, is an expert of (Marine) biology. Employed at the Institute of Applied Ecology in Marschacht, Germany since January 2014, Juliane Klan is engaged with the protection of fish species, within the scope of the fish monitoring at River Elbe. Amongst others she is commissioned with the monitoring of upstream migrating fish species at the fish pass in Geesthacht and at the water inlet of coal-fired powerplant ”Moorburg” in Hamburg. Apart from that Juliane Klan is involved in projects of fish tracking, by means of Telemetry and HDX transponder technology. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology (Berlin University 2010) and graduated in Marine Biology at the University of Rostock in 2012.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 23rd, 4:15 PM Jun 23rd, 4:30 PM

Session A6: Telemetric Survey of Upstream and Downstream Migrating Species at the River Elbe, Germany

Groningen, The Netherlands

Abstract:

The detection of movement patterns of species in rivers can be realised by acoustic telemetry. From 2012 till 2013 a survey on migrating species by means of telemetry was conducted in the river Elbe focussing on following questions: How do successful upstream migrating fish behave after swimming through a fish pass? To what extend is a direct downstream migration taking place? The investigation area is located 30 km upstream the city of Hamburg in the 400 m width headwater of the weir Geesthacht. The migration barrier is equipped with a new double slot pass at the north bank and a natural like channel (since 1996) at the south. 6 anadromous (n=161) and 10 potamodromous (n=127) species were tagged with an acoustic transmitter after passing the fish ways successfully. Additionally a group of tagged Atlantic salmon smolts (n=76) were released 8 km upstream the weir. 21 hydrophones were installed along the river banks over a section of 4 km upstream the weir to detect the movement patterns of the released specimens. Very good redetection quotes were achieved: 68% of anadromous as well as 65% of potamodromous species and 95% of salmon smolts were redetected.

Several typal behaviour patterns have been observed: No matter, if the tagged fish were released at the head of the old or the new fish pass, the upstream migrating anadromous specimens tend to follow the current flow to pass the investigation area very fast and in beeline. Also the salmon smolts migrated immediately in just 4 hours throughout the headwater and pass the weir. Not even local turbulences e.g. caused by a pumped storage plant could affect this movement patterns. In contrast potamodromous fish show a remarkable unsteady cruising behaviour and just onethird continued their upstream migration along the same river bank where they had been released.

https://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2015/June23/54