Event Title

Session B4: When and Why do Fish Migrate in Mediterranean Rivers? Observations of Fish Pass Assessments from Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula)

Location

Groningen, The Netherlands

Event Website

http://fishpassage.umass.edu/

Start Date

23-6-2015 12:05 PM

End Date

23-6-2015 12:30 PM

Description

Abstract:

Natural patterns of movement for Mediterranean native fish fauna, including their capability to use fish passes, are still poorly understood. Moreover, fish passage assessments could provide important knowledge regarding major causes and capabilities for fish migration (Lucas & Baras, 2001; Roni, 2005). We collected particular spawning periods of freshwater native cyprinid species (Barbus graellsii, Barbus haasi, Barbus meridionalis, Parachondrostoma miegii, Squalius laietanus) from Catalonia between 1987 and 1990 (Casals, 2005), among other periods and species (Salmo trutta, Salaria fluviatilis), including no native species as well. We selected 5 fish pass assessments, at least, with good quality of river connectivity for fish (indicating that it allows the passage of the majority or all native fish species potentially present) carried out using methods which permit estimation of barrier effect on fish (direct inspection of fish pass facilities) at different river stretches and river basins from Catalonia (Fluvià, Ter and Ebre) between 2006 and 2014. The assessed fish passes were: 2 fish ramps (1 of a gauging station and 1 of a hydropower weir), 2 pool passes (1 of a gauging station and 1 of a hydropower weir), and 1 ship lock fish-friendly improved management. Hydrological and environmental parameters (i. e. flow, water velocities, water temperature and moon cycle) were also daily collected. Spawning period was a primary driver of upstream fish migration, but a peak flow followed by a decrease of river flow, a minimum value of water temperature (variable between different species) and less bright moon phases were also important.

Comments

Presenting Author Bio: Marc Ordeix (Vic, Catalonia, 1966). Biologist. From 2001, he coordinates the CERM, Center for the Study of Mediterranean Rivers, environmental area of the Ter River Museum, in Manlleu (NE Catalonia). Its purpose is the study, dissemination and preservation of the Ter River and, by extension, other Mediterranean rivers and continental water ecosystems. The CERM is focused on ecological status assessment of rivers and lakes (riparian vegetation, aquatic macroinvertebrates, fish), and assessment of solutions to improve river connectivity for fish and ecological restoration projects of water inner systems. It also drives river conservation projects –riparian vegetation restoration, river habitat restoration and fish migration improvement-, mainly associated to land stewardship agreements. The CERM is also involved on environmental education –it provides training to thousands of students each year- and actively participates in public awareness. It works essentially in the whole of Catalonia, collaborating with universities and other institutions, but also participates in several international projects. For 2014-2018, he is the Scientific coordinator of the LIFE MIGRATOEBRE project (LIFE13 NAT/ES/000237): Fish migration species recovery and sustainable management of the final stretch of the Ebre River.

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Jun 23rd, 12:05 PM Jun 23rd, 12:30 PM

Session B4: When and Why do Fish Migrate in Mediterranean Rivers? Observations of Fish Pass Assessments from Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula)

Groningen, The Netherlands

Abstract:

Natural patterns of movement for Mediterranean native fish fauna, including their capability to use fish passes, are still poorly understood. Moreover, fish passage assessments could provide important knowledge regarding major causes and capabilities for fish migration (Lucas & Baras, 2001; Roni, 2005). We collected particular spawning periods of freshwater native cyprinid species (Barbus graellsii, Barbus haasi, Barbus meridionalis, Parachondrostoma miegii, Squalius laietanus) from Catalonia between 1987 and 1990 (Casals, 2005), among other periods and species (Salmo trutta, Salaria fluviatilis), including no native species as well. We selected 5 fish pass assessments, at least, with good quality of river connectivity for fish (indicating that it allows the passage of the majority or all native fish species potentially present) carried out using methods which permit estimation of barrier effect on fish (direct inspection of fish pass facilities) at different river stretches and river basins from Catalonia (Fluvià, Ter and Ebre) between 2006 and 2014. The assessed fish passes were: 2 fish ramps (1 of a gauging station and 1 of a hydropower weir), 2 pool passes (1 of a gauging station and 1 of a hydropower weir), and 1 ship lock fish-friendly improved management. Hydrological and environmental parameters (i. e. flow, water velocities, water temperature and moon cycle) were also daily collected. Spawning period was a primary driver of upstream fish migration, but a peak flow followed by a decrease of river flow, a minimum value of water temperature (variable between different species) and less bright moon phases were also important.

https://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2015/June23/92