Event Title

Session E9: Development of Low Head Fish Friendly Pumps and Turbines

Location

Groningen, The Netherlands

Event Website

http://fishpassage.umass.edu/

Start Date

24-6-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

24-6-2015 4:15 PM

Description

Abstract:

Some fish have an instinctive urge to migrate from sea to river water and back again. Eel provide the most intriguing example. After birth in the Sargasso Sea, they swim more than 5000 km to dwell in European rivers, and when mature, they return all the way back to reproduce. During this journey, they are often confronted with barriers such as sluice gates, pumps and turbines. The urge to migrate is so dominant that fish and eel enter every opening, which includes the intakes of pumps and turbines. Different studies have shown that fish and eel are severely damaged when swimming through a conventional pump or turbine. Various injuries are observed during the passage, of which the most prominent injury mechanisms involves blade strike injury, which is the focus of this article. Large fish mortality rates in these (rotating) turbo machines are reported, with some measurements showing values in excess of 80 % of the passing fish.

A theoretical model was developed to predict the probability of a fish colliding with rotating components of a turbo machine as well as the probability of consequent mortality caused by the collision. This model is based on several design parameters, including size, shape and speed. With the aid of this theoretical model, fish friendly design principles have been defined and applied by Pentair Fairbanks Nijhuis to a developed prototype fish friendly pump as well as a fish friendly turbine. The performance of the pump and turbine was optimized using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis. Extensive field tests were performed by independent parties and showed excellent results on efficiency as well as fish mortality rates. Here the design model as well as the results of the performed tests are presented.

Comments

Presenting Author Bio: Jacob Arnold is experienced in the analysis and design of turbo machines of various types. He is currently head of the R&D department of Pentair Fairbanks Nijhuis, located in Winterswijk - the Netherlands.

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Jun 24th, 4:00 PM Jun 24th, 4:15 PM

Session E9: Development of Low Head Fish Friendly Pumps and Turbines

Groningen, The Netherlands

Abstract:

Some fish have an instinctive urge to migrate from sea to river water and back again. Eel provide the most intriguing example. After birth in the Sargasso Sea, they swim more than 5000 km to dwell in European rivers, and when mature, they return all the way back to reproduce. During this journey, they are often confronted with barriers such as sluice gates, pumps and turbines. The urge to migrate is so dominant that fish and eel enter every opening, which includes the intakes of pumps and turbines. Different studies have shown that fish and eel are severely damaged when swimming through a conventional pump or turbine. Various injuries are observed during the passage, of which the most prominent injury mechanisms involves blade strike injury, which is the focus of this article. Large fish mortality rates in these (rotating) turbo machines are reported, with some measurements showing values in excess of 80 % of the passing fish.

A theoretical model was developed to predict the probability of a fish colliding with rotating components of a turbo machine as well as the probability of consequent mortality caused by the collision. This model is based on several design parameters, including size, shape and speed. With the aid of this theoretical model, fish friendly design principles have been defined and applied by Pentair Fairbanks Nijhuis to a developed prototype fish friendly pump as well as a fish friendly turbine. The performance of the pump and turbine was optimized using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis. Extensive field tests were performed by independent parties and showed excellent results on efficiency as well as fish mortality rates. Here the design model as well as the results of the performed tests are presented.

https://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2015/June24/32