Event Title

Session C7: Migration of River Lamprey in the Fragmented River Scheldt, Belgium?

Location

Groningen, The Netherlands

Event Website

http://fishpassage.umass.edu/

Start Date

24-6-2015 10:50 AM

End Date

24-6-2015 11:05 AM

Description

Abstract:

The disruption of longitudinal and lateral connectivity of rivers has led to ecological catastrophes such as the extinction of several diadromous fish species. River lamprey is an important indicator species for the integrity of ecosystems and connectivity within and between catchment areas. In the highly fragmented River Scheldt basin first restoration actions are undertaken, such as the building of nature-like bypasses. In 2011 and 2012 forty-one adult river lamprey were followed during their upstream migration in the tidal and/or non-tidal part of the River Scheldt and its tributaries using acoustic telemetry (Vemco technology: V7 and V8 transmitters; VR2 and VR2W data loggers). The migration patterns in the river catchment and their behaviour at a tidal barrier, lock-weir complexes and fish bypasses (passage timing and delay) show that the disrupted water management of the river and in consequence of its barriers and bypasses are the key to (un)successful spawning migration in the catchment.

Comments

Presenting Author Bio: David is a freshwater fish biologist in the Aquatic Management group at the Research Institute for Nature and Forest in Brussels (Belgium). He has more then 10 years of experience in fish migration studies with radio-, PIT- and acoustic telemetry, fish pass evaluations and fish mortality/passage studies at pumping stations.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 24th, 10:50 AM Jun 24th, 11:05 AM

Session C7: Migration of River Lamprey in the Fragmented River Scheldt, Belgium?

Groningen, The Netherlands

Abstract:

The disruption of longitudinal and lateral connectivity of rivers has led to ecological catastrophes such as the extinction of several diadromous fish species. River lamprey is an important indicator species for the integrity of ecosystems and connectivity within and between catchment areas. In the highly fragmented River Scheldt basin first restoration actions are undertaken, such as the building of nature-like bypasses. In 2011 and 2012 forty-one adult river lamprey were followed during their upstream migration in the tidal and/or non-tidal part of the River Scheldt and its tributaries using acoustic telemetry (Vemco technology: V7 and V8 transmitters; VR2 and VR2W data loggers). The migration patterns in the river catchment and their behaviour at a tidal barrier, lock-weir complexes and fish bypasses (passage timing and delay) show that the disrupted water management of the river and in consequence of its barriers and bypasses are the key to (un)successful spawning migration in the catchment.

https://scholarworks.umass.edu/fishpassage_conference/2015/June24/73