Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Paper in a panel / paper dans un panneau

Title// Titre

Panel 2 Paper 2.2: Integrative Management Planning Framework for Sustainable Development of Sub-Saharan African World Heritage Cultural Landscapes

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/b8wz-2e59

Organizer/Presenter/author Information // Informations sur l'organisateur / le présentateur / auteurs

Oris Malijani, Brandenburg Technical University of CottbusFollow

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Oris Malijani is a heritage professional working as a Principal Cultural Heritage Specialist in the Malawi Department of Culture. He work directly with local communities and other stakeholders in development and implementation of cultural heritage projects in areas of conservation, outreach programmes, marketing, research and resource mobilization. He has also been working as a Project Reviewer for African World Heritage Fund (AWHF) funded projects for over three years involved in assessing and evaluating funding projects submitted by African States parties. Among his research interests are topics like Cultural Landscapes, Heritage Management and Planning, Conflict Management in Heritage Places, Public Archaeology, Urban Heritage and Cultural Heritage Tourism. He holds a Master’s Degree in Heritage Management form University of Kent, UK and is currently pursuing a PhD in Heritage Studies at Brandenburg University of Technology, in Cottbus, Germany.

Keywords

Rural heritage, World Heritage, cultural landscapes, sustainable development, integration, management planning

Abstract // Résumé

Sub-Saharan African World Heritage cultural landscapes are adversely impacted by various development pressures, which calls for a holistic and integrated approach in their management. Coordinating and harmonizing development in World Heritage cultural landscapes is one of the most common challenges affecting the management and conservation of most Sub-Saharan African World Heritage properties. A study was carried out as part of a PhD in Heritage Studies research programme using two case studies Mount Mulanje Cultural Landscape in Malawi, a site on the UNESCO tentative list; and Mapungubwe World Heritage Cultural landscape of South Africa. The main aim of the research was to contribute to the methodological gap in cultural landscape planning by developing and applying an integrated strategic management planning methodological framework which has proposed strategic solutions to challenges faced when managing Sub-Saharan African World Heritage cultural landscapes that are threatened by various development activities. The study used two case studies as an effective comparative research strategy in the investigation of the conflicting issues of development pressure against the conservation of the significant cultural and natural attributes of cultural landscapes. The developed framework has provided a comprehensive level of technical support for decision-making in the management and conservation of Sub-Saharan African World Heritage cultural landscapes. The methodological tool has proposed long-term and holistic management planning strategies of integrating development into the management planning processes of African cultural landscapes. In order to facilitate the potential integration of cultural landscape conservation and development, the framework has suggested that all key stakeholders need to be committed to a collaborative approach to land use planning, decision-making, natural and cultural resource management, socio-economic development and stakeholder engagement.

Bibliographic References // Références Bibliographiques

Rossler, M. (2015). The Landscape approach- A global context for sustainability,. In T. Albert, Perceptions of sustainability in Heritage Studies (p. vol. 4 pp 739). Landscape and Heritage Research.

Palang, H., & et al. (2005). Rural Landscapes: past processes and future strategies. Landscape and Urban Planning.

Mumma, A. (2000). Legal Aspects of Cultural Landscape Protection in Africa World Heritage Cultural Landscapes, 1992–2002. Review and Prospect.

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Panel 2 Paper 2.2: Integrative Management Planning Framework for Sustainable Development of Sub-Saharan African World Heritage Cultural Landscapes

Sub-Saharan African World Heritage cultural landscapes are adversely impacted by various development pressures, which calls for a holistic and integrated approach in their management. Coordinating and harmonizing development in World Heritage cultural landscapes is one of the most common challenges affecting the management and conservation of most Sub-Saharan African World Heritage properties. A study was carried out as part of a PhD in Heritage Studies research programme using two case studies Mount Mulanje Cultural Landscape in Malawi, a site on the UNESCO tentative list; and Mapungubwe World Heritage Cultural landscape of South Africa. The main aim of the research was to contribute to the methodological gap in cultural landscape planning by developing and applying an integrated strategic management planning methodological framework which has proposed strategic solutions to challenges faced when managing Sub-Saharan African World Heritage cultural landscapes that are threatened by various development activities. The study used two case studies as an effective comparative research strategy in the investigation of the conflicting issues of development pressure against the conservation of the significant cultural and natural attributes of cultural landscapes. The developed framework has provided a comprehensive level of technical support for decision-making in the management and conservation of Sub-Saharan African World Heritage cultural landscapes. The methodological tool has proposed long-term and holistic management planning strategies of integrating development into the management planning processes of African cultural landscapes. In order to facilitate the potential integration of cultural landscape conservation and development, the framework has suggested that all key stakeholders need to be committed to a collaborative approach to land use planning, decision-making, natural and cultural resource management, socio-economic development and stakeholder engagement.