Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Panel/Présentations avec discussion du panel

Title// Titre

Panel 3 Constructing resilience: The entangled dimensions of nature and culture in agricultural landscapes and waterscapes

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/f2g1-er20

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Jessica Brown is Executive Director of the New England Biolabs Foundation, an independent, private foundation, and serves on the governing boards of Terralingua and International Funders for Indigenous Peoples. She has three decades of experience with community-based conservation in many countries and has published widely. Jessica chairs the Protected Landscapes Specialist Group of IUCN’s World Commission on Protected Areas and has recently joined the ICOMOS/IFLA Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes. She is an associate member of the Graduate Faculty of Rutgers University.

Maya Ishizawa is a member of ICOMOS Peru and ICOMOS/IFLA ISSCL. She coordinates the activities of UNESCO Chair on Nature-Culture Linkages in Heritage Conservation as a visiting lecturer at the University of Tsukuba, Japan. She graduated as an architect from the Universidad Ricardo Palma, in Lima, Peru. After earning a Master of Media and Governance from Keio University, in Japan, she completed a Ph.D. in Heritage Studies at BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, in Germany focused on the conservation of cultural landscapes. Currently engaged in the training of cultural and natural heritage practitioners in Asia and the Pacific, she looks at developing a comprehensive approach to heritage conservation.

Xavier Forde works for Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, the national agency for place-based cultural heritage in Aotearoa New Zealand, managing the recognition of sacred and ancestral places of significance to Māori. He is of the tribes of Raukawa and Ngāti Toa, but acquired a taste for radical politics growing up in France and Algeria, before finding a way back to his birthplace and obtaining a doctorate in political philosophy. Xavier is on the Board of ICOMOS NZ and co-chairs its Māori Heritage Committee, and is looking for opportunities to collaborate with indigenous peoples around better heritage practice.

Kuang-Chung Lee is Associate Professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies at National Dong-Hwa University (NDHU) in Taiwan. He holds a Ph.D. in Geography from the University College of London (2001), After completing his undergraduate studies in Geography at National Taiwan University in 1989, he worked for the Council of Agriculture and the Taroko National Park in Taiwan. He has carried out more than 30 research projects which mainly focus on community participation, natural and cultural landscape conservation, collaborative planning, and management of protected areas and rural areas. He is currently a member of IUCN’s World Commission on Protected Areas, ICOMOS and ProGEO, He serves as the focal point at his university for the International Partnership of the Satoyama Initiative.

George Ortsin is the Country Program Coordinator of the UNDP Global Environment Facility Small Grants Program in Ghana. He has been involved in promoting traditional landscape management, documentation of best practices and innovative strategies, and building partnerships and networks to strengthen local and national capacities. He promotes biodiversity management within socio-ecological production landscapes, with the view to providing livelihoods to sustain the cultural values of the local communities within traditional landscapes.

Keywords

cultural landscapes, rural heritage, resilience, biocultural diversity, Indigenous, agricultural landscapes, sacred sites intangible heritage, traditional knowledge, biodiversity, agrobiodiversity

Abstract // Résumé

Traditional practices of cultivating and gathering of food in rural areas embody the entangled dimensions of nature and culture. These traditional landscapes and waterscapes, living repositories of bio-cultural diversity, have much to teach us about resilience. This is manifest in the intangible and tangible cultural heritage associated with these places, including the physical shaping of the landscape and water systems; their complex systems of traditional knowledge, governance and management practices; and their sacred dimensions.

This workshop will build on sessions recently convened within the Culture-Nature/Nature-Culture Journeys ICOMOS Scientific Symposium (2017) and the IUCN World Conservation Congress (2016), which provided an opportunity to share experience from diverse regions on the theme of constructing resilience.In this session we will take the dialogue further, and will explore how frameworks being developed through global dialogues (such as the indicators of resilience in socio-ecological production landscapes used by the International Partnership of the Satoyama Initiative, or IPSI) can contribute to strategies for sustaining rural landscapes in diverse settings.

The workshop discussion will be anchored by three case-study papers from the Asia-Pacific region:

  1. Participatory planning and monitoring of protected landscapes: a case-study of an indigenous rice paddy landscape in TaiwanKuang-Chung Lee
  2. Nature, agriculture and rural resilience: Interdependencies between protected areas and Satoyama/Satoumi landscapes in rural areas of Japan Maya Ishizawa
  3. Māori ancestral landscapes and the celebration of prowess in cultivation and resource gathering: digesting natural heritage as an expression of culture – Xavier Forde

As a respondent, George Ortsin will bring a perspective from West Africa, reflecting on his experience working in rural areas of Ghana, including with the COMDEKS project (part of IPSI), which is supporting the resilience of socio-ecological production landscapes in rural Ghana.

Through case-study experience and facilitated dialogue participants will gain a better understanding of resilience in the context of socio-ecological systems for food cultivation and gathering.

Bibliographic References // Références Bibliographiques

Amend, T., Brown, J., Kothari, A., Phillips, A., and Stolton, S. 2008. Protected Landscapes and Agrobiodiversity Values.Volume I in the series,Values of Protected Landscapes and Seascapes. IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas and GTZ. Kasparek Verlag, Heidelberg, Germany.

Brown, Jessica and Kothari, Ashish. 2011. Traditional agricultural landscapes and Community-Conserved Areas: An overview. In: Journal of Management of Environmental Quality. Emerald Press. Bingley, United Kingdom.

Forde, Xavier. 2018. Kāpiti island: a sacred landscape.In Ishizawa, Maya, Inaba, Nobuko and Yoshida, Masahito, eds. (2018). “Proceedings of the Second Capacity Building Workshop on Nature-Culture Linkages in Heritage Conservation in Asia and the Pacific 2017, September 15-26, 2017, Tsukuba, Japan. Sacred Landscapes”, Journal of World Heritage Studies, University of Tsukuba, Special Issue 2018.

Lee, Kuang-Chung, and Shao-Yu Yan. 2019. Participatory planning and monitoring of protected landscapes: a case-study of an indigenous rice paddy cultural landscape in Taiwan. In Paddy and Water Environment, the journal of the International Society of Paddy and Water Engineering.

Ortsin, G. 2015. Ecological and socio-cultural resilience in managing traditional sacred landscapes in the coastal savannah ecosystem of Ghana. In, In: Taylor, K., St Clair, A., and Mitchell, N. Cultural Landscapes: Preservation Challenges in the 21stCentury. Routledge Press.

Ishizawa, Maya, Inaba, Nobuko and Yoshida, Masahito, eds. (2017). “Proceedings of the First Capacity Building Workshop on Nature-Culture Linkages in Heritage Conservation in Asia and the Pacific 2016, September 18-30, 2016, Tsukuba, Japan. Agricultural Landscapes, Journal of World Heritage Studies, University of Tsukuba, Special Issue 2017.

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Panel 3 Constructing resilience: The entangled dimensions of nature and culture in agricultural landscapes and waterscapes

Traditional practices of cultivating and gathering of food in rural areas embody the entangled dimensions of nature and culture. These traditional landscapes and waterscapes, living repositories of bio-cultural diversity, have much to teach us about resilience. This is manifest in the intangible and tangible cultural heritage associated with these places, including the physical shaping of the landscape and water systems; their complex systems of traditional knowledge, governance and management practices; and their sacred dimensions.

This workshop will build on sessions recently convened within the Culture-Nature/Nature-Culture Journeys ICOMOS Scientific Symposium (2017) and the IUCN World Conservation Congress (2016), which provided an opportunity to share experience from diverse regions on the theme of constructing resilience.In this session we will take the dialogue further, and will explore how frameworks being developed through global dialogues (such as the indicators of resilience in socio-ecological production landscapes used by the International Partnership of the Satoyama Initiative, or IPSI) can contribute to strategies for sustaining rural landscapes in diverse settings.

The workshop discussion will be anchored by three case-study papers from the Asia-Pacific region:

  1. Participatory planning and monitoring of protected landscapes: a case-study of an indigenous rice paddy landscape in TaiwanKuang-Chung Lee
  2. Nature, agriculture and rural resilience: Interdependencies between protected areas and Satoyama/Satoumi landscapes in rural areas of Japan Maya Ishizawa
  3. Māori ancestral landscapes and the celebration of prowess in cultivation and resource gathering: digesting natural heritage as an expression of culture – Xavier Forde

As a respondent, George Ortsin will bring a perspective from West Africa, reflecting on his experience working in rural areas of Ghana, including with the COMDEKS project (part of IPSI), which is supporting the resilience of socio-ecological production landscapes in rural Ghana.

Through case-study experience and facilitated dialogue participants will gain a better understanding of resilience in the context of socio-ecological systems for food cultivation and gathering.