Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Paper in a panel / paper dans un panneau

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/z564-tz94

Organizer/Presenter/author Information // Informations sur l'organisateur / le présentateur / auteurs

Kristal Buckley, Deakin UniversityFollow
Gwenaelle Bourdin, ICOMOSFollow
Leanna Wigboldus, University College Dublin, IrelandFollow

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Kristal Buckley AM is a Lecturer in Cultural Heritage at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. She served as an international Vice-President of ICOMOS from 2005-2014 and now works as an ICOMOS World Heritage Advisor. Her research has a focus on global heritage practices, with a particular interest in naturecultures. She has been involved with the IUCN/ICOMOS ‘Connecting Practice’ programme since its beginnings.

Gwenaëlle Bourdin is Director of the World Heritage Assessment Unit at the ICOMOS International Secretariat. Graduated in Economics, History and Art History, she joined ICOMOS after obtaining a DESS in History and Management of French and European Heritage in 1998 (University Panthéon-Sorbonne). She contributed to the drafting of the reference manual "Establishing a World Heritage nomination" prepared by the Advisory Bodies in collaboration with the World Heritage Center. It is involved in the joint ICOMOS / IUCN project "Connecting Practice" which explores new methods and practical strategies to better recognize and encourage the inter-connectivity between natural and cultural heritage within World Heritage sites. She has also participated in numerous expert capacity-building workshops around the world on the fundamental principles of the World Heritage Convention.

Leanna Wigboldus completed her Masters of Science in World Heritage Conservation and Management at University College Dublin and is currently a PhD Candidate in World Heritage at the same institution. With a passion for all types of history and heritage, she works for the ICOMOS International Secretariat in Paris, France.

Keywords

NatureCulture, CultureNature, cultural landscapes, rural heritage

Abstract // Résumé

Rural landscapes with interconnected CultureNature heritage value have much to contribute to the resiliency and sustainability of food production, use of renewable natural resources and overall well-being of communities. Rural landscapes are addressed in UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in SDG 11 as a type of ‘human settlement’ and Target 11.4 calls for 'strengthening efforts ‘to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.’ Even so, to date, the contributions of rural landscapes have had limited recognition within the global framework for the UN SDGs and some reference in the UN-Habitat New Urban Agenda.

This paper will contribute a case study from the ICOMOS/IUCN Connecting Practice project that aims to develop new approaches to the recognition of interconnected character of natural and cultural values in heritage designation and management frameworks. Reflections on a case study from Phase III of this project (2018-2020) will focus on the natural and cultural systems that can support the resilience of agricultural and biocultural landscapes. Conducted in cooperation with the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) and their program on ‘Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems’ (GIAHS), practical experience with rural landscapes/waterscapes will demonstrate how resilience and sustainability are supported by biocultural practices. This case study will provide insights for a panel discussion on how to more fully recognize the contributions from rural landscapes and mainstream them within the SDGs and the New Urban Agenda.

Bibliographic References // Références Bibliographiques

Buckley, Kristal, and Tim Badman (2014) ‘Nature+Culture and World Heritage: Why It Matters’ in Proceedings of University of Montreal Round Table: Exploring the Cultural Value of Nature: a World Heritage Context, 12- 14 March 2014, Christina Cameron and Judith Herrmann (eds). Montreal: University of Montreal, 105-121.

ICOMOS (2017b) Principles Concerning Rural Landscapes as Heritage. Available at: https://www.icomos.org/images/DOCUMENTS/General_Assemblies/19th_Delhi_2017/Working_Documents-First_Batch-August_2017/GA2017_6-3-1_RuralLandscapesPrinciples_EN_final20170730.pdf

IUCN and ICOMOS (2015) Connecting Practice Phase I: Final Narrative Report. Available at: https://www.iucn.org/downloads/connecting_practice_report_iucn_icomos_.pdf

Leitão, Leticia, Gwenaëlle Bourdin, Tim Badman and Leanna Wigboldus (2017) Connecting Practice Phase II: Final Report. ICOMOS/IUCN. Available at: http://openarchive.icomos.org/1841/

Potts, Andrew (2017) ‘An Urgent Journey: Realizing the Potential of Integrated Nature-Culture Approaches to Create a Sustainable World,’ The George Wright Forum 34, 2:229-237. Available at: http://www.georgewright.org/342potts.pdf

Share

COinS
 

Panel 4 Paper 4.3: Rural Landscape Case Study from ICOMOS/IUCN Connecting Practice Project: Learning about resilience and sustainability from practical experience

Rural landscapes with interconnected CultureNature heritage value have much to contribute to the resiliency and sustainability of food production, use of renewable natural resources and overall well-being of communities. Rural landscapes are addressed in UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in SDG 11 as a type of ‘human settlement’ and Target 11.4 calls for 'strengthening efforts ‘to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.’ Even so, to date, the contributions of rural landscapes have had limited recognition within the global framework for the UN SDGs and some reference in the UN-Habitat New Urban Agenda.

This paper will contribute a case study from the ICOMOS/IUCN Connecting Practice project that aims to develop new approaches to the recognition of interconnected character of natural and cultural values in heritage designation and management frameworks. Reflections on a case study from Phase III of this project (2018-2020) will focus on the natural and cultural systems that can support the resilience of agricultural and biocultural landscapes. Conducted in cooperation with the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) and their program on ‘Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems’ (GIAHS), practical experience with rural landscapes/waterscapes will demonstrate how resilience and sustainability are supported by biocultural practices. This case study will provide insights for a panel discussion on how to more fully recognize the contributions from rural landscapes and mainstream them within the SDGs and the New Urban Agenda.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.