Workshop Format// Formats des Ateliers

Paper in a panel / paper dans un panneau

Title// Titre

Panel 9. Paper 9.1: Implications of rejuvenation on tradition tank irrigation systems - A case study of Ghanapuram, a 13th century temple town in Telangana, India

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7275/nt9y-1718

Organizer/Presenter/author Information // Informations sur l'organisateur / le présentateur / auteurs

Noah Anand Fernandes Ar, Goa UniversityFollow
Nandini Priya Thatikonda Ar, GN Heritage MattersFollow

Biographical Information // Informations biographiques

Noah Fernandes and Nandini Priya Thatikonda are conservation architects from School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi.

Noah has a keen interest in cultural landscapes and is actively involved with various conservation and cultural heritage projects in Goa. He currently works as an Assistant Professor at Goa College of Architecture, India.

Nandini works on research and documentation of temple architecture of the Deccan region. She is currently a consultant at GN Heritage Matters and is involved with various on-site conservation projects in Hyderabad.

Both Noah and Nandini have been working together on the conservation of the temple complex at Ghanapuram, Telangana since 2017.

Keywords

Cultural Landscapes, Rural Heritage

Abstract // Résumé

Telangana state, located in the Deccan Plateau, was subjected to major droughts and floods between the years 1960-2010, which occurred due to the damage and poor management of its historic water systems. Responding to this crisis faced in the region, the Government of the newly formed state of Telangana launched the ‘Mission Kakatiya’, a scheme which aimed to restore centuries-old tank irrigation networks.

The Ghanpur tank is among the major tanks that were revived as a part of this project through de-silting and strengthening of the embankment, in 2017. The Ganapuram town, tank and temple complex were established in the early 13th century by Ganapati Reddy a subordinate ruler under the Kakatiya kings, with the tank on the south, and the temple complex on the north of the settlement. The tank spreads over an area of 725 hectares, irrigating 1,200 hectares of farmland through re-laid historic water channels. Historically the tank was managed by the community as collective ownership under the temple. Over time due to change administrative systems, the community was disconnected with its resources, both historic irrigation system and the temple. Currently, each of these resources is under the ownership of various departments, who work independently, addressing parts or portions of the town in isolation, without a collective goal to form a self-sustaining system.

The paper on “Implications of rejuvenation on tradition tank irrigation systems” will introduce a critical dialogue on the ways forward in carrying out rejuvenation projects within rural historic landscapes. Here participants will be encouraged to understand various aspects of traditional self-sustaining systems that work within temple towns in India. Further, they will be able to work towards demonstrating means of encouraging community ownership and involvement to facilitate sustainable reintegration, in turn reducing the need to depend on the inconsistent flow of government resources.

Bibliographic References // Références Bibliographiques

References:

Mission of the program - Mission Kakatiya - missionkakatiya.cgg.gov.in

Raju, S.C. (2013) Kakatiya Dynasty: The Golden Age of Telugu Civilization, Hyderabad.

Rao, Pandurangarao (1992) Engineering and technological advancements in the Kakatiya Period, Warangal : INTACH Warangal Chapter

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Panel 9. Paper 9.1: Implications of rejuvenation on tradition tank irrigation systems - A case study of Ghanapuram, a 13th century temple town in Telangana, India

Telangana state, located in the Deccan Plateau, was subjected to major droughts and floods between the years 1960-2010, which occurred due to the damage and poor management of its historic water systems. Responding to this crisis faced in the region, the Government of the newly formed state of Telangana launched the ‘Mission Kakatiya’, a scheme which aimed to restore centuries-old tank irrigation networks.

The Ghanpur tank is among the major tanks that were revived as a part of this project through de-silting and strengthening of the embankment, in 2017. The Ganapuram town, tank and temple complex were established in the early 13th century by Ganapati Reddy a subordinate ruler under the Kakatiya kings, with the tank on the south, and the temple complex on the north of the settlement. The tank spreads over an area of 725 hectares, irrigating 1,200 hectares of farmland through re-laid historic water channels. Historically the tank was managed by the community as collective ownership under the temple. Over time due to change administrative systems, the community was disconnected with its resources, both historic irrigation system and the temple. Currently, each of these resources is under the ownership of various departments, who work independently, addressing parts or portions of the town in isolation, without a collective goal to form a self-sustaining system.

The paper on “Implications of rejuvenation on tradition tank irrigation systems” will introduce a critical dialogue on the ways forward in carrying out rejuvenation projects within rural historic landscapes. Here participants will be encouraged to understand various aspects of traditional self-sustaining systems that work within temple towns in India. Further, they will be able to work towards demonstrating means of encouraging community ownership and involvement to facilitate sustainable reintegration, in turn reducing the need to depend on the inconsistent flow of government resources.